LISP 1

The original Lisp. Invented by John McCarthy et al at MIT in the late 50's. Followed by LISP 1.5.

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Liskov substitution principleLisp*LISPLISP 1LISP 1.5LISP 2LISP70

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LISP 1.5

The second version of Lisp, successor to LISP 1. Developed at MIT in 1959. Followed by LISP 1.75, LISP 1.9, Lisp 2 and many other versions.

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Lisp*LISPLISP 1LISP 1.5LISP 2LISP70LISP ALISP Extended Algebraic Facility

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LISP 2

LISP 1.5 with an ALGOL 60-like surface syntax. Also optional type declarations, new data types including integer-indexed arrays and character strings, partial-word extraction/insertion operators and macros. A pattern-matching facility similar to COMIT was proposed. Implemented for the Q-32 computer.

["The LISP 2 Programming Language and System", P.W. Abrahams et al, Proc FJCC 29:661-676, AFIPS (Fall 1966).]

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LISP 1LISP 1.5LISP 2LISP70LISP ALISP Extended Algebraic Facility

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LISP70

A Lisp dialect descended from MLISP and MLISP2. Also known as PLISP and VEL. Useful for parsing. Only the pattern-matching system was published and fully implemented. According to Alan Kay, LISP70 had an influence on Smalltalk-72. "The LISP70 Pattern Matching System, Larry Tesler et al, IJCAI 73.

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LISP 1.5LISP 2LISP70LISP ALISP Extended Algebraic Facility

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LISP A

"LISP A: A LISP-like System for Incremental Computing", E.J. Sandewall, Proc SJCC 32 (1968).

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LISP 2LISP70LISP ALISP Extended Algebraic FacilityLispkit

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LISP Extended Algebraic Facility

<language>

(LEAF)

["An Algebraic Extension to LISP", P.H. Knowlton, Proc FJCC 35 1969].

Last updated: 1996-06-07

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LISP ALISP Extended Algebraic FacilityLispkitLispkit Lisp

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Lispkit

<language>

A functional programming language designed by Peter Henderson with Lisp syntax. Designed for portability. The Lispkit implementation is an extension to Landin's SECD machine that supports lazy evaluation. See also Stack environment control dump machine.

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LISP Extended Algebraic FacilityLispkitLispkit LispLisp-Linda

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Lispkit Lisp

Purely functional version of LISP. "Functional Programming, Application and Implementation", P. Henderson, P-H 1980.

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LISP Extended Algebraic FacilityLispkitLispkit LispLisp-LindaLisp Machine

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Lisp-Linda

P. Dourish, U Edinburgh 1988.

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LispkitLispkit LispLisp-LindaLisp MachineLISP Machine LISP

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Lisp Machine

<architecture>

1. Any machine (whether notional or actual) whose instruction set is Lisp.

<hardware, operating system>

2. A line of workstations made by Symbolics, Inc. from the mid-1970s (having grown out of the MIT AI Lab) to late 1980s. All system code for Symbolics Lisp Machines was written in Lisp Machine Lisp. Symbolics Lisp Machines were also notable for having had space-cadet keyboards.

[More details and historical background?]

Lisp Machine Museum.

Last updated: 2003-07-03

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Lisp-LindaLisp MachineLISP Machine LISPLisp Object-Oriented Programming System

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LISP Machine LISP

<language>

An extension of Maclisp, now called Zetalisp.

Last updated: 1998-12-13

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Lisp MachineLISP Machine LISPLisp Object-Oriented Programming System

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Lisp Object-Oriented Programming System

(LOOPS) An object-oriented extension of Lisp from the Intelligent Systems Laboratory at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center. It is used in the development of knowledge-based systems.

See also CommonLoops.

["The LOOPS Manual", D.G. Bobrow & M. Stefik, Xerox Corp 1983].

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Lisp Object-Oriented Programming SystemLISP, Objects, and Symbolic Programming

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LISP, Objects, and Symbolic Programming

A book with compiler included by Robert R. Kessler and Amy R. Petajan, published by Scott, Foresman and Company, Glenview, IL, USA. (1988).

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Lisp Object-Oriented Programming SystemLISP, Objects, and Symbolic ProgrammingLisptalk

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Lisptalk

"Concurrent Programming Language Lisptalk", C. Li, SIGPLAN Notices 23(4):71-80 (Apr 1988).

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LISP, Objects, and Symbolic ProgrammingLisptalkLispViewlist

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LispView

CLOS based windowing system on OpenWindows.

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LISP, Objects, and Symbolic ProgrammingLisptalkLispViewlistlist comprehension

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list

<data>

A data structure holding many values, possibly of different types, which is usually accessed sequentially, working from the head to the end of the tail - an "ordered list". This contrasts with a (one-dimensional) array, any element of which can be accessed equally quickly.

Lists are often stored using a cell and pointer arrangement where each value is stored in a cell along with an associated pointer to the next cell. A special pointer, e.g. zero, marks the end of the list. This is known as a (singly) "linked list". A doubly linked list has pointers from each cell to both next and previous cells.

An unordered list is a set.

Last updated: 1998-11-12

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LisptalkLispViewlistlist comprehensionList Enhancedlistless

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list comprehension

<functional programming>

An expression in a functional language denoting the results of some operation on (selected) elements of one or more lists. An example in Haskell:

[ (x,y) | x <- [1 .. 6], y <- [1 .. x], x+y < 10]

This returns all pairs of numbers (x,y) where x and y are elements of the list 1, 2, ..., 10, y <= x and their sum is less than 10.

A list comprehension is simply "syntactic sugar" for a combination of applications of the functions, concat, map and filter. For instance the above example could be written:

	filter p (concat (map (\ x -> map (\ y -> (x,y))
			 [1..x]) [1..6]))
	where
	p (x,y) = x+y < 10

According to a note by Rishiyur Nikhil <nikhil@crl.dec.com>, (August 1992), the term itself seems to have been coined by Phil Wadler circa 1983-5, although the programming construct itself goes back much further (most likely Jack Schwartz and the SETL language).

The term "list comprehension" appears in the references below.

The earliest reference to the notation is in Rod Burstall and John Darlington's description of their language, NPL.

David Turner subsequently adopted this notation in his languages SASL, KRC and Miranda, where he has called them "ZF expressions", set abstractions and list abstractions (in his 1985 FPCA paper [Miranda: A Non-Strict Functional Language with Polymorphic Types]).

["The OL Manual" Philip Wadler, Quentin Miller and Martin Raskovsky, probably 1983-1985].

["How to Replace Failure by a List of Successes" FPCA September 1985, Nancy, France, pp. 113-146].

Last updated: 1995-02-22

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LispViewlistlist comprehensionList EnhancedlistlessListproc

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List Enhanced

<operating system, tool>

An MS-DOS file browsing utility written by Vern Buerg in 1983. A former mainframe systems programmer, Buerg wrote DOS utilities when he began using an IBM PC and missed the file-scanning ability he had on mainframes. The software became an instant success, and his list utility was in use on an estimated 5 million PCs.

shareware version.

Last updated: 1997-05-16

Nearby terms:

listlist comprehensionList EnhancedlistlessListproclists

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listless

<programming>

In functional programming, a property of a function which allows it to be combined with other functions in a way that eliminates intermediate data structures, especially lists.

Phil Wadler's thesis gives the conditions for a function to be in listless form: each input list is traversed only once, one element at a time, from left to right. Each output list is generated once, one element at a time, from left to right. No other lists are generated or traversed.

Not all functions can be expressed in listless form (e.g. reverse).

Last updated: 1995-02-22

Nearby terms:

list comprehensionList EnhancedlistlessListproclistsListserv

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Listproc

A mailing list processor owned and developed by BITNET which runs under Unix.

See also Listserv, Majordomo.

[Details?]

Last updated: 1995-02-22

Nearby terms:

list comprehensionList EnhancedlistlessListproclistsListservLiszt

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lists

list

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List EnhancedlistlessListproclistsListservLisztliteliteral

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Listserv

<messaging>

An automatic mailing list server, initially written to run under IBM's VM operating system by Eric Thomas.

Listserv is a user name on some computers on BITNET/EARN which processes electronic mail requests for addition to or deletion from mailing lists. Examples are listserv@ucsd.edu, listserver@nysernet.org.

Some listservs provide other facilities such as retrieving files from archives and database search. Full details of available services can usually be obtained by sending a message with the word HELP in the subject and body to the listserv address.

Eric Thomas, has recently formed an international corporation, L-Soft, and has ported Listserv to a number of other platforms including Unix. Listserv has simultaneously been enhanced to use both the Internet and BITNET.

Two other major mailing list processors, both of which run under Unix, are Majordomo, a freeware system, and Listproc, currently owned and developed by BITNET.

Last updated: 1995-02-22

Nearby terms:

listlessListproclistsListservLisztliteliteralliterate programming

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Liszt

A Franz Lisp compiler in C which emits C, by Jeff W. Dalton <jeff@festival.ed.ac.uk>.

Mailing list: franz-friends-request@berkeley.edu.

Last updated: 1994-10-20

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ListproclistsListservLisztliteliteralliterate programming

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