tera-

prefix

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terabyte

<unit, data>

(TB) A unit of data equal to one trillion bytes. A terabyte is 10^12 bytes or 1000^4 bytes or 1000 gigabytes.

A terabyte is roughly the amount of data in 117 DVDs (at 8.5 gigabytes each).

1000 terabytes are one petabyte.

(Note the spelling - one 'r'). See prefix.

Last updated: 2013-11-03

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teraflop

<unit>

10^12 flops.

Intel beat Hitachi to the record of 1.06 teraflops, on 04 Dec 1996, unofficially in Beverton, Oregon, using 7264 Pentium Pro chips.

Last updated: 1997-07-21

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tenured graduate studenttera-terabyteteraflopteraflop clubTERMTERMAC

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teraflop club

<body>

/te'r*-flop kluhb/ (From tera- and flops) A mythical association of people who consume outrageous amounts of computer time in order to produce a few simple pictures of glass balls with intricate ray-tracing techniques. Caltech professor James Kajiya is said to have been the founder.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1997-07-21

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tera-terabyteteraflopteraflop clubTERMTERMACtermcapterminak

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TERM

<networking>

1. A program by Michael O'Reilly <[email protected]> for people running Unix who have Internet access via a dial-up connection, and who don't have access to SLIP, or PPP, or simply prefer a more lightweight protocol. TERM does end-to-end error-correction, compression and mulplexing across serial links. This means you can upload and download files as the same time you're reading your news, and can run X clients on the other side of your modem link, all without needing SLIP or PPP.

Latest version: 1.15.

ftp://tartarus.uwa.edu.au/pub/oreillym/term/term115.tar.gz.

<business>

2. Technology Enabled Relationship Management.

Last updated: 1999-10-04

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terabyteteraflopteraflop clubTERMTERMACtermcapterminak

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TERMAC

An interactive matrix language.

["Users Guide to TERMAC", J.S. Miller et al, MIT Dec 1968].

Last updated: 1994-11-04

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teraflopteraflop clubTERMTERMACtermcapterminakterminal

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termcap

<operating system>

(terminal capabilities) A Unix database listing different types of terminal (or terminal emulation) and the character strings to send to make the terminal perform certain functions such as move the cursor up one line or clear the screen.

Programs written using termcap can work on any terminal in the database which supports the necessary functions. Typical programs are text editors or file viewers like more. The termcap routines look for an environment variable "TERM" to determine which terminal the user is using.

terminfo is a later version of termcap.

Last updated: 1998-10-30

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TERMTERMACtermcapterminakterminalTerminal Access Controller

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terminak

/ter'mi-nak`/ [Caltech, ca. 1979] Any malfunctioning computer terminal. A common failure mode of Lear-Siegler ADM 3a terminals caused the "L" key to produce the "K" code instead; complaints about this tended to look like "Terminak #3 has a bad keyboard. Pkease fix." See AIDX, Nominal Semidestructor, Open DeathTrap, ScumOS, sun-stools, Telerat, HP-SUX.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-04-14

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TERMACtermcapterminakterminalTerminal Access Controller

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terminal

<hardware>

1. An electronic or electromechanical device for entering data into a computer or a communications system and displaying data received. Early terminals were called teletypes, later ones VDUs. Typically a terminal communicates with the computer via a serial line.

<electronics>

2. The end of a line where signals are either transmitted or received, or a point along the length of a line where the signals are made available to apparatus.

<electronics>

3. Apparatus to send and/or receive signals on a line.

Last updated: 1995-10-02

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terminakterminalTerminal Access Controllerterminal adapter

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Terminal Access Controller

<hardware, networking>

(TAC) A device which connects terminals to the Internet, usually using dial-up modem connections and the TACACS protocol.

Last updated: 1997-11-27

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terminalTerminal Access Controllerterminal adapterTerminal Adaptor

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terminal adapter

Terminal Adaptor

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Terminal Access Controllerterminal adapterTerminal Adaptor

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Terminal Adaptor

<networking, hardware>

(TA) Equipment used to adapt Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Basic Rate Interface (BRI) channels to existing terminal equipment standards such as EIA-232 and V.35. A Terminal Adaptor is typically packaged like a modem, either as a stand-alone unit or as an interface card that plugs into a computer or other communications equipment (such as a router or PBX). A Terminal Adaptor does not interoperate with a modem; it replaces it.

[ISDN FAQ].

Last updated: 1994-10-03

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terminal adapterTerminal Adaptorterminal brain deathterminal emulation

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terminal brain death

The extreme form of terminal illness. What someone who has obviously been hacking continuously for far too long is said to be suffering from.

[Jargon File]

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Terminal Adaptorterminal brain deathterminal emulationterminal emulator

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terminal emulation

What a terminal emulator does.

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terminal brain deathterminal emulationterminal emulatorterminal illness

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terminal emulator

<communications>

A program that allows a computer to act like a (particular brand of) terminal, e.g. a vt-100. The computer thus appears as a terminal to the host computer and accepts the same escape sequences for functions such as cursor positioning and clearing the screen.

xterm is a terminal emulator for the X Window System.

Last updated: 1995-02-16

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terminal emulationterminal emulatorterminal illnessterminal junkie

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terminal illness

raster burn

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terminal emulatorterminal illnessterminal junkieterminal node

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terminal junkie

(UK) A wannabee or early larval stage hacker who spends most of his or her time wandering the directory tree and writing noddy programs just to get a fix of computer time. Variants include "terminal jockey", "console junkie", and console jockey. The term "console jockey" seems to imply more expertise than the other three (possibly because of the exalted status of the console relative to an ordinary terminal).

See also twink, read-only user.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-02-16

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terminal illnessterminal junkieterminal nodeTerminal Oriented Real Time Operating System

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terminal node

leaf

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terminal junkieterminal nodeTerminal Oriented Real Time Operating System

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Terminal Oriented Real Time Operating System

<operating system>

(TORTOS) An operating system developed from MVT at Health Sciences Computing, UCLA by Dr. Patrica Britt from the late 1960s to the mid 1970s.

Dr. Britt was a senior scientist at IBM, who become the Assistant Director of HSCF.

TORTOS pre-dated TSO and provided batch, real-time and time sharing on an IBM 360/91.

Last updated: 2004-07-02

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Terminal Oriented Real Time Operating SystemTerminal Oriented Social Science

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Terminal Oriented Social Science

<project>

(TOSS) The Cambridge Project Project MAC was an ARPA-funded political science computing project. They worked on topics like survey analysis and simulation, led by Ithiel de Sola Pool, J.C.R. Licklider and Douwe B. Yntema. Yntema had done a system on the MIT Lincoln Labs TX-2 called the Lincoln Reckoner, and in the summer of 1969 led a Cambridge Project team in the construction of an experiment called TOSS. TOSS was like Logo, with matrix operators. A major feature was multiple levels of undo, back to the level of the login session. This feature was cheap on the Lincoln Reckoner, but absurdly expensive on Multics.

Last updated: 1997-01-29

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Terminal Oriented Social ScienceTerminal Productivity eXecutive

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Terminal Productivity eXecutive

<operating system>

(TPX) A multiple session manager used to access mainframe applications. It was written by Morgan Stanley, acquired by Duquesne Systems and is now owned by Computer Associates. TPX allows you to work in multiple mainframe applications concurrently; lock and unlock your TPX screen; place your applications on hold; logon to TPX from a different terminal without losing your place; customize your TPX menu and send a screen image to another TPX user.

TPX runs on MVS and VM. On VM, like VTAM, it uses the MVS-like facilities of GCS. It has a complete scripting facility and lets you see other user's sessions. The client-server version allows each managed session to open in its own window. Richard Kuebbing has built a complete e-mail system into it.

Unicenter CA-TPX.

Last updated: 2005-09-29

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Terminal Oriented Social ScienceTerminal Productivity eXecutiveterminal server

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terminal server

A device which connects many terminals (serial lines) to a local area network through one network connection. A terminal server can also connect many network users to its asynchronous ports for dial-out capabilities and printer access.

Last updated: 1995-02-16

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Terminal Productivity eXecutiveterminal serverTerminal User Interface

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Terminal User Interface

Textual User Interface

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terminal serverTerminal User InterfaceTerminate and Stay Resident

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Terminate and Stay Resident

(TSR) A type of DOS utility which, once loaded, stays in memory and can be reactivated by pressing a certain combination of keys.

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termination analysis

A program analysis which attempts to determine whether evaluation of a given expression will definitely terminate.

Evaluation of a constant is bound to terminate, as is evaluation of a non-recursive function applied to arguments which are either not evaluated or which can themselves be proved to terminate. A recursive function can be shown to terminate if it can be shown that the arguments of the recursive calls are bound to reach some value at which the recursion will cease.

Termination analysis can never guarantee to give the correct answer because this would be equivalent to solving the halting problem so the answer it gives is either "definitely terminates" or "don't know".

Last updated: 1994-10-20

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terminator

<electronics>

A resistor connected to a signal wire in a bus or network for the purpose of impedance matching to prevent reflections.

For example, a 50 ohm resistor connected across the end of an Ethernet cable. SCSI chains and some LocalTalk wiring schemes also require terminators.

Last updated: 1995-05-17

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termination analysisterminatorterm rewriting systemTerms Of Service

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term rewriting system

(TRS) A collection of rewrite rules used to transform terms (expressions, strings in some formal language) into equivalent terms. See reduction.

Last updated: 1994-11-04

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termination analysisterminatorterm rewriting systemTerms Of Serviceternary

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Terms Of Service

<networking>

(TOS) The rules laid down by an on-line service provider such as AOL that members must obey or risk being "TOS-sed" (disconnected).

Last updated: 1999-04-02

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terminatorterm rewriting systemTerms Of Serviceternaryterpri

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ternary

<programming>

A description of an operator taking three arguments. The only common example is C's ?: operator which is used in the form "CONDITION ? EXP1 : EXP2" and returns EXP1 if CONDITION is true else EXP2. Haskell has a similar "if CONDITION then EXP1 else EXP2" operator.

See also unary, binary.

Last updated: 1998-07-29

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terpri

/ter'pree/ TERminate PRInt line. [LISP 1.5 and later, MacLISP] To output a newline. Still used in Common LISP. On some early operating systems and hardware, no characters would be printed until a complete line was formed, so this operation terminated the line and emitted the output.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1996-06-24

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terrabyte

<spelling>

It's spelled "terabyte".

Last updated: 1997-01-23

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Terms Of ServiceternaryterpriterrabyteTersetesttest coverage

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Terse

Language for decryption of hardware logic.

["Hardware Logic Simulation by Compilation", C. Hansen, 25th ACM/IEEE Design Automation Conf, 1988].

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