secondary cache

<memory management>

(Or "second level cache", "level two cache", "L2 cache") A larger, slower cache between the primary cache and main memory. Whereas the primary cache is often on the same integrated circuit as the central processing unit (CPU), a secondary cache is usually external.

Last updated: 1997-06-25

secondary damage

When a fatal error occurs (especially a segfault) the immediate cause may be that a pointer has been trashed due to a previous fandango on core. However, this fandango may have been due to an *earlier* fandango, so no amount of analysis will reveal (directly) how the damage occurred. "The data structure was clobbered, but it was secondary damage."

By extension, the corruption resulting from N cascaded fandangoes on core is "Nth-level damage". There is at least one case on record in which 17 hours of grovelling with "adb" actually dug up the underlying bug behind an instance of seventh-level damage! The hacker who accomplished this near-superhuman feat was presented with an award by his fellows.

[Jargon File]

secondary key

<database>

A candidate key which is not selected as a primary key.

Last updated: 1997-04-26

secondary storage

<storage>

Any non-volatile storage medium that is not directly accessible to the processor. Memory directly accessible to the processor includes main memory, cache and the CPU registers. Secondary storage includes hard drives, magnetic tape, CD-ROM, DVD drives, floppy disks, punch cards and paper tape.

Secondary storage devices are usually accessed via some kind of controller. This contains registers that can be directly accessed by the CPU like main memory ("memory mapped"). Reading and writing these registers can cause the device to perform actions like reading a block of data off a disk or rewinding a tape. See also DMA.

Programs and data stored in secondary storage must first be loaded into main memory before the processor can use them.

Last updated: 1997-11-05

Nearby terms:

SECD machinesecondary cachesecondary damagesecondary key

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