newbie

<jargon>

/n[y]oo'bee/ (Sometimes shorted to "noob") Originally from British public-school and military slang variant of "new boy", an inexperienced user.

This term surfaced in the newsgroup talk.bizarre but is now in wide use. Criteria for being considered a newbie vary wildly; a person can be called a newbie in one group while remaining a respected regular in another. The label "newbie" is sometimes applied as a serious insult to a person who has been around for a long time but who carefully hides all evidence of having a clue.

See BIFF.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 2007-08-02

New Flavors

An object-oriented Lisp from Symbolics, the successor to Flavors, it led to CLOS.

["Reference Guide to Symbolics-Lisp", Symbolics, March 1985].

Last updated: 1994-10-10

newgroup wars

/n[y]oo'groop worz/ [Usenet] The salvos of dueling "newgroup" and "rmgroup" messages sometimes exchanged by persons on opposite sides of a dispute over whether a newsgroup should be created net-wide, or (even more frequently) whether an obsolete one should be removed. These usually settle out within a week or two as it becomes clear whether the group has a natural constituency (usually, it doesn't). At times, especially in the completely anarchic alt hierarchy, the names of newsgroups themselves become a form of comment or humour; e.g. the spinoff of alt.swedish.chef.bork.bork.bork from alt.tv.muppets in early 1990, or any number of specialised abuse groups named after particularly notorious flamers, e.g. alt.weemba.

[Jargon File]

New Jersey

[Primarily Stanford/Silicon Valley] Brain-damaged or of poor design. This refers to the allegedly wretched quality of such software as C, C++ and Unix (which originated at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, New Jersey). "This compiler bites the bag, but what can you expect from a compiler designed in New Jersey?" Compare Berkeley Quality Software. See also Unix conspiracy.

newline

<character, jargon>

/n[y]oo'li:n/ Line feed or other character sequence used to terminate a line of text.

Unix uses line feed as its text line terminator - a Bell-Labs-ism rather than a Berkeleyism. Interestingly (and unusually for Unix jargon), it is said to have originally been an IBM usage. Though the term "newline" appears in ASCII standards, it never caught on in the general computing world before Unix. The encoding of line feed as "\n" in C and Unix strings comes from this name.

The term has been used more generally for any end of line character, character sequence (e.g. crlf), or operation (like Pascal's writeln procedure or Lisp 1.5's terpri) required to terminate a text record or separate lines.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1997-07-14

NEWP

NEW Programming language

NEW Programming language

<language>

(NEWP) A language which replaced ESPOL on the Burroughs Large System.

Last updated: 1994-12-13

NeWS

/nee'wis/, /n[y]oo'is/ or /n[y]ooz/ Network extensible Window System.

Many hackers insist on the two-syllable pronunciations above as a way of distinguishing NeWS from news (the netnews software).

[Jargon File]

news

netnews

NewsClip

A very high level language designed for writing netnews filters. It translates into C. It includes support for various newsreaders. Version 1.01 includes a translator from NewsClip to C, examples and documentation.

NewsClip was written by Looking Glass Software Ltd. and is distributed and used by ClariNet Communications Corporation It is only supported for ClariNet customers. Output of the filters may not be sold and donation for use of this program is hinted at.

E-mail: <[email protected]>.

Last updated: 1992-10-25

newsfroup

<messaging, humour>

A silly synonym for Usenet newsgroup, originally a typo but now in regular use on Usenet's talk.bizarre and other lunatic-fringe groups.

Compare hing, grilf, and filk.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1994-12-13

newsgroup

<messaging>

One of Usenet's huge collection of topic groups or fora. Usenet groups can be "unmoderated" (anyone can post) or "moderated" (submissions are automatically directed to a moderator, who edits or filters and then posts the results). Some newsgroups have parallel mailing lists for Internet people with no netnews access, with postings to the group automatically propagated to the list and vice versa. Some moderated groups (especially those which are actually gatewayed Internet mailing lists) are distributed as "digests", with groups of postings periodically collected into a single large posting with an index.

Among the best-known are comp.lang.c (the C-language forum), comp.arch (on computer architectures), comp.Unix.wizards (for Unix wizards), rec.arts.sf-lovers (for science-fiction fans), and talk.politics.misc (miscellaneous political discussions and flamage).

Barry Shein <[email protected]> is alleged to have said, "Remember the good old days when you could read all the group names in one day?" This gives a good idea of the growth and size of Usenet.

See also netiquette.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1994-12-13

newsletter

<publication>

A periodically published work containing news and announcements on some subject, typically with a small circulation. Newsletters are a common application for DTP and may be distributed by electronic mail.

Last updated: 1996-12-10

Newspeak

A language inspired by Scratchpad.

[J.K. Foderaro. "The Design of a Language for Algebraic Computation", Ph.D. Thesis, UC Berkeley, 1983].

Newsqueak

A concurrent applicative language with synchronous channels.

["Newsqueak: A Language for Communicating with Mice", R. Pike CSTR143, Bell Labs (March 1989)].

["The Implementation of Newsqueak", Rob Pike, Soft Prac & Exp 20(7):649-659 (July 1990)].

news reader

<messaging>

A browser program which enables a user to read articles posted to Usenet. Articles may be stored in a local (or NFS-mounted) spool directory, or retrieved via NNTP.

Examples are rn, GNUS, and nn.

Last updated: 1996-04-09

New Storage System

<storage>

(NSS) A major Multics implementation project during the 1970s. The initial Multics file system design had evolved from the one-huge-disk world of CTSS. When multiple disk units were used they were just assigned increasing ranges of disk addresses, so a segment could have pages scattered over all disks on the system. This provided good I/O parallelism but made crash recovery expensive. NSS redesigned the lower levels of the file system, introducing the concepts of logical volume and physical volume and a mapping from a Multics directory branch to a VTOC entry for each file. The new system had much better recovery performance in exchange for a small space and performance cost.

Last updated: 1997-01-29

new talk

ntalk

New Testament

[C programmers] The second edition of K&R's "The C Programming Language" (Prentice-Hall, 1988; ISBN 0-13-110362-8), describing ANSI C.

[Jargon File]

Newton

1. (Named after Isaac Newton (1642-1727)). Rapin et al, Swiss Federal Inst Tech, Lausanne 1981. General purpose expression language, syntactically ALGOL-like, with object-oriented and functional features and a rich set of primitives for concurrency. Used for undergraduate teaching at Lausanne (EPFL).

Versions: Newton 2.6 for VAX/VMS and Newton 1.2 for DEC-Alpha/OSF-1.

E-mail: J. Hulaas <[email protected]>. ftp://ellc4.epfl.ch /pub/languages/Newton.

["Procedural Objects in Newton", Ch. Rapin, SIGPLAN Notices 24(9) (Sep 1989)].

["The Newton Language", Ch. Rapin et al, SIGPLAN Notices 16(8):31-40 (Aug 1981)].

["Programming in Newton", Wuetrich and Menu, EPFL 1982].

2. Apple Newton.

Last updated: 2000-08-29

Newton-Raphson iteration

<algorithm>

An iterative algorithm for solving equations. Given an equation,

 f x = 0

and an initial approximation, x(0), a better approximation is given by:

 x(i+1) = x(i) - f(x(i)) / f'(x(i))

where f'(x) is the first derivative of f, df/dx.

Newton-Raphson iteration is an example of an anytime algorithm in that each approximation is no worse than the previous one.

Last updated: 2007-06-19

Newton's method

Newton-Raphson

NewWave

A graphical user interface and object-oriented environment from Hewlett-Packard, based on Windows and available on Unix workstations.

NewYacc

A parser generator by Jack Callahan <[email protected]>. Version 1.0.

ftp://flubber.cs.umd.edu/src/.

[Dec 89 CACM, A brief overview of NewYacc].

Last updated: 1992-02-10

New York State Educational Reasearch ETwork

(NYSERNET) A New York Internet access provider and regional network. NYSERNet has been in the Internet business since about 1985 and have recently upgraded to a T3 backbone (45 megabits per second). They work with Sprint, NYNEX and Rochester Telephone.

NYSERNet, Inc., provides Internet Training provided through the NYSERNet Internet Training and Education Center (NITEC), a twenty-four station hands-on facility in Syracuse, NY. The Information Services Group supplies tools for marketing via the Internet and NYSERNET also provide Technical Consulting Services.

http://nysernet.org/.

E-mail: <[email protected]>.

Last updated: 1995-02-01

New York University

(NYU) Established in 1831, New York University today includes thirteen schools, colleges and divisions located in New York City's borough of Manhattan, as well as research centers and programs in the surrounding suburbs and abroad.

http://nyu.edu/.

Nearby terms:

NeutrosophyNever OfflinenewbieNew Flavorsnewgroup warsNew Jersey

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