that was the model for the more

successful IDMS.

Several versions of transaction processing were designed for GCOS-3 and GCOS-8. An early attempt at TP for GCOS-3, not taken up in Europe, assumed that, as in Unix, a new process should be started to handle each transaction. IBM customers required a more efficient model where multiplexed threads wait for messages and can share resources. Those features were implemented as subsystems.

GCOS-3 soon acquired a proper TP monitor called Transaction Driven System (TDS). TDS was essentially a Honeywell development. It later evolved into TP8 on GCOS-8. TDS and its developments were commercially successful and predated IBM CICS, which had a very similar architecture.

GCOS-6 and GCOS-4 (ex-GCOS-62) were superseded by Motorola 68000-based minicomputers running Unix and the product lines were discontinued.

In the late 1980s Bull took over Honeywell and Bull's management chose Unix, probably with the intent to move out of hardware into middleware. Bull killed the Boston proposal to port Multics to a platform derived from DPS-6. Very few customers rushed to convert from GCOS to Unix and new machines (of CMOS technology) were still to be introduced in 1997 with GCOS-8. GCOS played a major role in keeping Honeywell a dismal also-ran in the mainframe market.

Some early Unix systems at Bell Labs used GCOS machines for print spooling and various other services. The field added to "/etc/passwd" to carry GCOS ID information was called the "GECOS field" and survives today as the "pw_gecos" member used for the user's full name and other human-ID information.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1998-04-23

Nearby terms:

that was the model for the morein Europe, assumed that, as in {Unix}, a new process

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