G2

A real-time expert system from Gensym Corporation.

Nearby terms:

FXSFYAFYIFYI4G<g>G2G3G4GAgaGabrielgabriel

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

G3

<protocol, compression>

1. Group 3 fax.

<hardware, processor>

2. PowerPC G3.

Last updated: 1998-09-10

Nearby terms:

FYIFYI4G<g>G2G3G4GAgaGabrielgabrielGabriel, Richard

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

G4

Group 4

Nearby terms:

G<g>G2G3G4GAgaGabrielgabrielGabriel, Richard

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GA

genetic algorithm

Nearby terms:

<g>G2G3G4GAgaGabrielgabrielGabriel, RichardGADS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

ga

<networking>

The country code for Gabon.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

G2G3G4GAgaGabrielgabrielGabriel, RichardGADSGaelic

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gabriel

<language>

A graphical DSP language for simulation and real systems.

["A Design Tool for Hardware and Software for Multiprocessor DSP Systems," E.A. Lee, E. Goei, J. Bier & S. Bhattacharya, DSP Systems, Proc ISCAS-89, 1989].

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1994-12-23

Nearby terms:

G3G4GAgaGabrielgabrielGabriel, RichardGADSGaelic

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gabriel

/gay'bree-*l/ (After Richard Gabriel) An unnecessary (in the opinion of the opponent) stalling tactic, e.g. tying one's shoelaces or combing one's hair repeatedly, asking the time, etc. Also used to refer to the perpetrator of such tactics. Also, "pulling a Gabriel", "Gabriel mode".

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1999-10-12

Nearby terms:

G4GAgaGabrielgabrielGabriel, RichardGADSGaelicgag

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gabriel, Richard

Richard Gabriel

Nearby terms:

GAgaGabrielgabrielGabriel, RichardGADSGaelicgagGAIA

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GADS

Picture retrieval language. "Integrated Geographical Databases: The GADS Experience", P.E. Mantey et al, in Database Techniques for Pictorial Applications, A. Blaser ed, pp.193-198.

Nearby terms:

gaGabrielgabrielGabriel, RichardGADSGaelicgagGAIAGAL

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gaelic

For automated test programs. Used in military, essentially replaced by ATLAS.

Nearby terms:

GabrielgabrielGabriel, RichardGADSGaelicgagGAIAGALGalaxy

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gag

Equivalent to choke, but connotes more disgust. "Hey, this is Fortran code. No wonder the C compiler gagged." See also barf.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

gabrielGabriel, RichardGADSGaelicgagGAIAGALGalaxyGalileo

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GAIA

GUI Application Interoperability Architecture. An OSF project.

Nearby terms:

Gabriel, RichardGADSGaelicgagGAIAGALGalaxyGalileoGambit

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GAL

<hardware>

Generic Array Logic.

Last updated: 1995-12-09

Nearby terms:

GADSGaelicgagGAIAGALGalaxyGalileoGambitgamesgame tree

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Galaxy

<language>

An extensible language in the vein of EL/1 and RCC.

["Introduction to the Galaxy Language", Anne F. Beetem et al, IEEE Software 6(3):55-62].

Last updated: 1995-12-09

Nearby terms:

GaelicgagGAIAGALGalaxyGalileoGambitgamesgame treeGAMMA

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Galileo

["Galileo: A Strongly Typed Interactive Conceptual Language", A. Albano et al, ACM Trans Database Sys 10(2):230-260 (June 1985)].

Nearby terms:

gagGAIAGALGalaxyGalileoGambitgamesgame treeGAMMAgamma correction

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gambit

<language>

A variant of Scheme R3.99 supporting the future construct of Multilisp by Marc Feeley <feeley@iro.umontreal.ca>. Implementation includes optimising compilers for Macintosh (with Toolbox and built-in editor) and Motorola 680x0 Unix systems and HP300, BBN GP100 and NeXT. Version 2.0 conforms to the IEEE Scheme standard.

Gambit used PVM as its intermediate language.

ftp://acorn.cs.brandeis.edu/dist, ftp://ftp.cso.uiuc.edu/pub/amiga/fish/f7/ff764/Gambit_Terp. ftp://ftp.iro.umontreal.ca/pub/parallele/gambit/.

Mailing list: gambit@trex.umontreal.ca.

Last updated: 1998-02-10

Nearby terms:

GALGalaxyGalileoGambitgamesgame treeGAMMAgamma correction

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

games

<games>

"The time you enjoy wasting is not time wasted." -- Bertrand Russell.

Here are some games-related pages on the Web: Imperial Nomic, Thoth's games and recreations page, Games Domain, Zarf's List of Games on the Web, Dave's list of pointers to games resources, Collaborative Fiction.

See also 3DO, ADL, ADVENT, ADVSYS, alpha/beta pruning, Amiga, CHIP-8, Core Wars, DROOL, empire, I see no X here., Infocom, Inglish, initgame, life, minimax, moria, mudhead, multi-user Dimension, nethack, ogg, plugh, rogue, SPACEWAR, virtual reality, wizard mode, wumpus, xyzzy, ZIL, zorkmid.

See also game theory.

Last updated: 1996-03-03

Nearby terms:

GalaxyGalileoGambitgamesgame treeGAMMAgamma correction

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

game tree

<games>

A tree representing contingencies in a game. Each node in a game tree represents a possible position (e.g., possible configuration of pieces on a chessboard) in the game, and each branching ("edge" in graph terms) represents a possible move.

Last updated: 1998-11-14

Nearby terms:

GalileoGambitgamesgame treeGAMMAgamma correctionGAMSgamut

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GAMMA

<language>

1. A language for matrices and generation of mathematical programming reports.

["GAMMA 3.3 for MPS/MPSX, IBM System:/360", Bonnor & Moore Assocs (Mar 1975)].

2. A high-level parallel language.

[Research Directions in High-Level Parallel Languages, LeMetayer ed, Springer 1992].

Last updated: 1994-11-29

Nearby terms:

Gambitgamesgame treeGAMMAgamma correctionGAMSgamutGAN

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gamma correction

<hardware>

Adjustments applied during the display of a digital representation of colour on a screen in order to compensate for the fact that the Cathode Ray Tubes used in computer monitors (and televisions) produce a light intensity which is not proportional to the input voltage. The light intensity is actually proportional to the input voltage raised to the inverse power of some constant, called gamma. Its value varies from one display to another, but is usually around 2.5.

Because it is more intuitive for the colour components (red, green and blue) to be varied linearly in the computer, the actual voltages sent to the monitor by the display hardware must be adjusted in order to make the colour component intensity on the screen proportional to the value stored in the computer's display memory. This process is most easily achieved by a dedicated module in the display hardware which simply scales the outputs of the display memory before sending them to the digital-to-analogue converters.

More expensive graphics cards and workstations (particularly those used for CAD applications) will have a gamma correction facility.

In combination with the "white-point" gamma correction is used to achieve precise colour matching.

Robert Berger's explanation of monitor gamma.

["Digital Imaging in C and the World Wide Web", W. David Schwaderer].

Last updated: 1999-02-01

Nearby terms:

gamesgame treeGAMMAgamma correctionGAMSgamutGANGANDALF

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GAMS

Guide to Available Mathematical Software

Nearby terms:

game treeGAMMAgamma correctionGAMSgamutGANGANDALFgang bang

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gamut

The gamut of a monitor is the set of colours it can display. There are some colours which can't be made up of a mixture of red, green and blue phosphor emissions and so can't be displayed by any monitor.

[Examples?]

Last updated: 1994-11-29

Nearby terms:

GAMMAgamma correctionGAMSgamutGANGANDALFgang bangGAP

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GAN

Generating and Analyzing Networks. "GAN - A System for Generating and Analyzing Activity Networks", A. Schurmann, CACM 11(10) (Oct 1968).

Nearby terms:

gamma correctionGAMSgamutGANGANDALFgang bangGAPGAPLog

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GANDALF

A software development environment from Carnegie Mellon University.

Nearby terms:

GAMSgamutGANGANDALFgang bangGAPGAPLoggarbageabetical order

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gang bang

The use of large numbers of loosely coupled programmers in an attempt to wedge a great many features into a product in a short time. Though there have been memorable gang bangs (e.g. that over-the-weekend assembler port mentioned in Steven Levy's "Hackers"), most are perpetrated by large companies trying to meet deadlines; the inevitable result is enormous buggy masses of code entirely lacking in orthogonality. When market-driven managers make a list of all the features the competition has and assign one programmer to implement each, the probability of maintaining a coherent (or even functional) design goes infinitesimal. See also firefighting, Mongolian Hordes technique, Conway's Law.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

gamutGANGANDALFgang bangGAPGAPLoggarbageabetical order

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GAP

<mathematics, tool>

Groups Algorithms and Programming.

A system for symbolic mathematics for computational discrete algebra, especially group theory, by Johannes Meier, Alice Niemeyer, Werner Nickel, and Martin Schonert of Aachen. GAP was designed in 1986 and implemented 1987. Version 2.4 was released in 1988 and version 3.1 in 1992.

Sun version.

["GAP 3.3 Manual, M. Schonert et al, Lehrstuhl D Math, RWTH Aachen, 1993].

Last updated: 1995-04-12

Nearby terms:

GANDALFgang bangGAPGAPLoggarbageabetical ordergarbage collect

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GAPLog

General Amalgamated Programming with Logic. LOGPRO group, Linkoping Sweden. A restricted version of constraint logic programming, using S-unification but not restricted to a single domain.

[Chapter in forthcoming Springer book on ESPRIT]

Nearby terms:

gang bangGAPGAPLoggarbageabetical ordergarbage collectgarbage collection

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

garbageabetical order

<humour>

1. The result of using an insertion sort to merge data into an unsorted list.

2. The state of any file or list that is supposed to be sorted, but is not.

Last updated: 1997-02-11

Nearby terms:

GAPLoggarbageabetical ordergarbage collectgarbage collection

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

garbage collect

garbage collection

Nearby terms:

garbageabetical ordergarbage collectgarbage collectionGarbage In, Garbage Out

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

garbage collection

<programming>

(GC) The process by which dynamically allocated storage is reclaimed during the execution of a program. The term usually refers to automatic periodic storage reclamation by the garbage collector (part of the run-time system), as opposed to explicit code to free specific blocks of memory.

Automatic garbage collection is usually triggered during memory allocation when the amount free memory falls below some threshold or after a certain number of allocations. Normal execution is suspended and the garbage collector is run. There are many variations on this basic scheme.

Languages like Lisp represent expressions as graphs built from cells which contain pointers and data. These languages use automatic dynamic storage allocation to build expressions. During the evaluation of an expression it is necessary to reclaim space which is used by subexpressions but which is no longer pointed to by anything. This reclaimed memory is returned to the free memory pool for subsequent reallocation.

Without garbage collection the program's memory requirements would increase monotonically throughout execution, possibly exceeding system limits on virtual memory size.

The three main methods are mark-sweep garbage collection, reference counting and copying garbage collection.

See also the AI koan about garbage collection.

Last updated: 1997-08-25

Nearby terms:

garbage collectgarbage collectionGarbage In, Garbage OutGargoyle

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Garbage In, Garbage Out

<humour>

(GIGO) /gi:'goh/ Wilf Hey's maxim expressing the fact that computers, unlike humans, will unquestioningly process nonsensical input data and produce nonsensical output. Of course a properly written program will reject input data that is obviously erroneous but such checking is not always easy to specify and is tedious to write.

GIGO is usually said in response to lusers who complain that a program didn't "do the right thing" when given imperfect input or otherwise mistreated in some way. Also commonly used to describe failures in human decision making due to faulty, incomplete, or imprecise data.

The expansion "Garbage In, Gospel Out" is an ironic comment on the tendency to put excessive trust in "computerised" data.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 2004-10-03

Nearby terms:

garbage collectgarbage collectionGarbage In, Garbage OutGargoyleGarnet

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gargoyle

A language for compiler writing.

[J.V. Garwick, CACM 7(1):16-20, (Jan 1964)].

Last updated: 1994-11-04

Nearby terms:

garbage collectionGarbage In, Garbage OutGargoyleGarnetGARP

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Garnet

1. A graphical object editor and Macintosh environment.

2. A user interface development environment for Common Lisp and X11 from The Garnet project team. It helps you create graphical, interactive user interfaces.

Version 2.2 includes the following: a custom object-oriented programming system which uses a prototype-instance model. automatic constraint maintenance allowing properties of objects to depend on properties of other objects and be automatically re-evaluated when the other objects change. The constraints can be arbitrary Lisp expressions. Built-in, high-level input event handling. Support for gesture recognition. Widgets for multi-font, multi-line, mouse-driven text editing. Optional automatic layout of application data into lists, tables, trees or graphs. Automatic generation of PostScript for printing. Support for large-scale applications and data visualisation.

Also supplied are: two complete widget sets, one with a Motif look and feel implemented in Lisp and one with a custom look and feel. Interactive design tools for creating parts of the interface without writing code: Gilt interface builder for creating dialog boxes. Lapidary interactive tool for creating new widgets and for drawing application-specific objects. C32 spreadsheet system for specifying complex constraints.

Not yet available: Jade automatic dialog box creation system. Marquise interactive tool for specifying behaviours.

ftp://a.gp.cs.cmu.edu/usr/garnet/garnet.

Last updated: 1999-07-02

Nearby terms:

Garbage In, Garbage OutGargoyleGarnetGARPgarplyGartner Group

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GARP

A graphical language for concurrent programming.

["Visual Concurrent Programmint in GARP", S.K. Goering er al, PARLE '89 v.II, LNCS 366, pp. 165-180].

Last updated: 1994-11-03

Nearby terms:

Garbage In, Garbage OutGargoyleGarnetGARPgarplyGartner Groupgas

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

garply

/gar'plee/ A metasyntactic variable like foo, once popular among SAIL hackers.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1994-11-03

Nearby terms:

GargoyleGarnetGARPgarplyGartner GroupgasGASPgas plasma display

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gartner Group

<company>

One of the biggest IT industry research firms.

Address: Connecticut, USA.

[URL?]

Last updated: 1997-09-30

Nearby terms:

GarnetGARPgarplyGartner GroupgasGASPgas plasma display

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gas

GNU assembler

Nearby terms:

GARPgarplyGartner GroupgasGASPgas plasma displayGATGATE

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GASP

<library>

1. Graph Algorithm and Software Package.

<simulation>

2. General Activities Simulation Program.

<simulation>

3. General Aerodynamic Simulation Program.

Nearby terms:

garplyGartner GroupgasGASPgas plasma displayGATGATEgate

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gas plasma display

<electronics>

A type of display containing super-energised neon gas, used mostly in flat monitor and television screens. Each pixel has a transistor that controls its colour and brightness.

Plasma. Flat Screen Technology. More about Gas Plasma.

[How does it work?]

Last updated: 1998-04-30

Nearby terms:

Gartner GroupgasGASPgas plasma displayGATGATEgategated

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GAT

Generalized Algebraic Translator. Improved version of IT. On IBM 650 RAMAC.

[Sammet 1969, p. 142].

Nearby terms:

Gartner GroupgasGASPgas plasma displayGATGATEgategatedGates

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GATE

GAT Extended? Based on IT.

[Sammet 1969, p. 139].

Nearby terms:

gasGASPgas plasma displayGATGATEgategatedGatesgateway

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gate

<hardware>

A low-level digital logic component. Gates perform Boolean functions (e.g. AND, NOT), store bits of data (e.g. a flip-flop), and connect and disconnect various parts of the overall circuit to control the flow of data (tri-state buffer).

In a CPU, the term applies particularly to the buffers that route data between the various functional units. Each gate allows data to flow from one unit to another or enables data from one output onto a certain bus.

Last updated: 1999-09-02

Nearby terms:

gas plasma displayGATGATEgategatedGatesgatewayGateway 2000

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gated

/gayt-dee/ Gate daemon.

A program which supports multiple routing protocols and protocol families. It may be used for routing, and makes an effective platform for routing protocol research.

ftp://gated.cornell.edu.

See also Exterior Gateway Protocol, Open Shortest Path First, Routing Information Protocol, routed.

Last updated: 1994-12-07

Nearby terms:

gas plasma displayGATGATEgategatedGatesgatewayGateway 2000Gauss

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gates

Bill Gates

Nearby terms:

GATEgategatedGatesgatewayGateway 2000GaussGaussian distribution

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gateway

<networking>

1. A deprecated term for a device that enables data to flow between different networks (forming an internet).

Preferred terms are "protocol converter" (connects networks that use different protocols), "router" (connects two broadcast networks at layer 3 (network layer). Another example is a mail gateway, which is a layer 7 (application layer) gateway.

<hypertext>

2. An interface between an information source and a web server. Common Gateway Interface is a standard for such interfaces. The information source can be any system that can be accessed by a program running on the web server. A typical example is a relational database.

Last updated: 2000-05-24

Nearby terms:

gatedGatesgatewayGateway 2000GaussGaussian distribution

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gateway 2000

<company>

One of the lagest US manufacturers of IBM compatibles, founded by CEO Ted Waitt in September 1985, in Sioux City, Iowa. In 1990 the company moved to North Sioux City, South Dakota.

In August 1994, quarterly profits were $4 million on sales of $617 million. Sales for the first quarter of 1997 were $1.42 billion.

On 1997-05-15 Gateway bought the Amiga brand.

http://gw2k.com/.

Last updated: 1998-07-30

Nearby terms:

GatesgatewayGateway 2000GaussGaussian distributiongawk

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gauss

<person>

1. Carl Friedrich Gauss.

<statistics>

2. Gaussian distribution.

See normal distribution.

<unit>

3. The unit of magnetic field strength. 1 gauss = 1 Maxwell / cm^2.

A good loudspeaker coil magnet flux density is of the order of 10000 gauss.

<language>

4. A powerful matrix programming language by Aptech Systems. Gauss is very popular with econometricians.

http://rhkoning.xs4all.nl/gauss/index.htm.

Last updated: 2003-10-25

Nearby terms:

GatesgatewayGateway 2000GaussGaussian distributiongawkGB

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gaussian distribution

normal distribution

Nearby terms:

gatewayGateway 2000GaussGaussian distributiongawkGBGb

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gawk

<tool, language>

GNU awk. Gawk is a superset of standard awk and includes some Plan 9 features.

David Trueman and Arnold Robbins of Georgia Institute of Technology were developing it in 1993. It has been ported to Unix, MS-DOS, Macintosh, and Archimedes.

Latest version: 2.15.3, as of 1993-11-08.

Available by FTP from your nearest GNU archive site.

Mac version.

Last updated: 2000-10-21

Nearby terms:

Gateway 2000GaussGaussian distributiongawkGBGbgbg-bell

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GB

<unit>

gigabytes or gigabits - see MB. Giga stands for 10^9 - a US billion, or in computing for 2^30.

The text of a thirty volume encyclopaedia would require about one gigabyte of ASCII storage.

Last updated: 1997-03-27

Nearby terms:

Gateway 2000GaussGaussian distributiongawkGBGbgbg-bellGBIP

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gb

<unit>

Gigabit. 10^9 bits. Might also be wrongly used for gigabyte (GB).

Last updated: 1997-03-27

Nearby terms:

GaussGaussian distributiongawkGBGbgbg-bellGBIPGBML

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gb

<networking>

(Great Britain) A country code for United Kingdom. "uk" is generally used instead.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

Gaussian distributiongawkGBGbgbg-bellGBIPGBMLgbps

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

g-bell

bell

Nearby terms:

Gaussian distributiongawkGBGbgbg-bellGBIPGBMLgbpsGCGCAL

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GBIP

General Purpose Interface Bus

Nearby terms:

Gaussian distributiongawkGBGbgbg-bellGBIPGBMLgbpsGCGCALGCCGCL

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GBML

Genetics Based Machine Learning

Nearby terms:

gawkGBGbgbg-bellGBIPGBMLgbpsGCGCALGCCGCLG-Code

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gbps

gigabits per second

Nearby terms:

GBGbgbg-bellGBIPGBMLgbpsGCGCALGCCGCLG-CodeGCOS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GC

1. garbage collection.

2. A storage allocator with garbage collection by Hans-J. Boehm and Alan J. Demers. Gc is a plug-in replacement for C's malloc. Since the collector does not require pointers to be tagged, it does not attempt to ensure that all inaccessible storage is reclaimed.

Version 3.4 has been ported to Sun-3, Sun-4, Vax/BSD, Ultrix, Intel 80386/Unix, SGI, Alpha/OSF/1, Sequent (single threaded), Encore (single threaded), RS/600, HP-UX, Sony News, A/UX, Amiga, NeXT.

ftp://parcftp.xerox.com/pub/russell/gc3.4.tar.Z.

Last updated: 2000-04-19

Nearby terms:

gbg-bellGBIPGBMLgbpsGCGCALGCCGCLG-CodeGCOSGCOS Macro Assembler Program

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GCAL

<text, tool>

The Cambridge Phoenix equivalent of troff. So called because all Cambridge utilities were named after birds, GCAL was a "run off" equivalent, and Geococcyx californianus is the Latin name of the roadrunner. GCAL was eventually obsoleted by TeX.

It is believed that even more obscure puns lurked in the depths of Phoenix. Perhaps it is better they stayed there.

Last updated: 2003-12-05

Nearby terms:

GBIPGBMLgbpsGCGCALGCCGCLG-CodeGCOSGCOS Macro Assembler Program

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GCC

<compiler, programming>

The GNU Compiler Collection, which currently contains front ends for C, C++, Objective-C, Fortran, Java, and Ada, as well as libraries for these languages (libstdc++, libgcj, etc).

GCC formerly meant the GNU C compiler, which is a very high quality, very portable compiler for C, C++ and Objective C.

The compiler supports multiple front-ends and multiple back-ends by translating first into Register Transfer Language and from there into assembly code for the target architecture.

http://gcc.gnu.org/. Bug Reports. FTP gcc-2.X.X.tar.gz from your nearest GNU archive site. MS-DOS.

Mailing lists: gcc-help@gcc.gnu.org, gcc-announce@gcc.gnu.org (announcements).

["Using and Porting GNU CC", R.M. Stallman, 1992-12-16].

Last updated: 2003-08-05

Nearby terms:

gbpsGCGCALGCCGCLG-CodeGCOSGCOS Macro Assembler Program

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GCL

General Control Language. A portable job control language.

["A General Control Interface for Satellite Systems", R.J. Dakin in Command Languages, C. Unger ed, N-H 1973].

Nearby terms:

GCGCALGCCGCLG-CodeGCOSGCOS Macro Assembler ProgramGCR

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

G-Code

1. Johnsson & Augustsson, Chalmers Inst Tech. Intermediate language used by the G-machine, an implementation of graph reduction based on supercombinators. "Efficient Compilation of Lazy Evaluation", T. Johnsson, SIGPLAN Notices 19(6):58-69 (June 1984).

2. A machine-like language for the representation and interpretation of attributed grammars. Used as an intermediate language by the Coco compiler generator. "A Compiler Generator for Microcomputers", P. Rechenberg et al, P-H 1989.

Nearby terms:

GCALGCCGCLG-CodeGCOSGCOS Macro Assembler ProgramGCRGCT

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GCOS

<operating system>

/jee'kohs/ An operating system developed by General Electric from 1962; originally called GECOS (the General Electric Comprehensive Operating System).

The GECOS-II operating system was developed by General Electric for the 36-bit GE-635 in 1962-1964. Contrary to rumour, GECOS was not cloned from System/360 [DOS/360?] - the GE-635 architecture was very different from the IBM 360 and GECOS was more ambitious than DOS/360.

GE Information Service Divsion developed a large special multi-computer system that was not publicised because they did not wish time sharing customers to challenge their bills. Although GE ISD was marketing DTSS - the first commercial time sharing system - GE Computer Division had no license from Dartmouth and GE-ISD to market it to external customers, so they designed a time-sharing system to sell as a standard part of GECOS-III, which replaced GECOS-II in 1967. GECOS TSS was more general purpose than DTSS, it was more a programmer's tool (program editing, e-mail on a single system) than a BASIC TSS.

The GE-645, a modified 635 built by the same people, was selected by MIT and Bell for the Multics project. Multics' infancy was as painful as any infancy. Bell pulled out in 1969 and later produced Unix.

After the buy-out of GE's computer division by Honeywell, GECOS-III was renamed GCOS-3 (General Comprehensive Operating System). Other OS groups at Honeywell began referring to it as "God's Chosen Operating System", allegedly in reaction to the GCOS crowd's uninformed and snotty attitude about the superiority of their product. [Can anyone confirm this?] GCOS won and this led in the orphaning and eventual death of Honeywell Multics.

Honeywell also decided to launch a new product line called Level64, and later DPS-7. It was decided to mainatin, at least temporarily, the 36-bit machine as top of the line, because GCOS-3 was so successfull in the 1970s. The plan in 1972-1973 was that GCOS-3 and Multics should converge. This plan was killed by Honeywell management in 1973 for lack of resources and the inability of Multics, lacking databases and transaction processing, to act as a business operating system without a substantial reinvestment.

The name "GCOS" was extended to all Honeywell-marketed product lines and GCOS-64, a completely different 32-bit operating system, significanctly inspired by Multics, was designed in France and Boston. GCOS-62, another different 32-bit low-end DOS level was designed in Italy. GCOS-61 represented a new version of a small system made in France and the new DPS-6 16-bit minicomputer line got GCOS-6.

When the intended merge between GCOS-3 and Multics failed, the Phoenix designers had in mind a big upgrade of the architecture to introduce segmentation and capabilities. GCOS-3 was renamed GCOS-8, well before it started to use the new features which were introduced in next generation hardware.

The GCOS licenses were sold to the Japanese companies NEC and Toshiba who developed the Honeywell products, including GCOS, much further, surpassing the IBM 3090 and IBM 390.

When Honeywell decided in 1984 to get its top of the range machines from NEC, they considered running Multics on them but the Multics market was considered too small. Due to the difficulty of porting the ancient Multics code they considered modifying the NEC hardware to support the Multics compilers.

GCOS3 featured a good Codasyl database called IDS (Integrated Data Store) that was the model for the more successful IDMS.

Several versions of transaction processing were designed for GCOS-3 and GCOS-8. An early attempt at TP for GCOS-3, not taken up in Europe, assumed that, as in Unix, a new process should be started to handle each transaction. IBM customers required a more efficient model where multiplexed threads wait for messages and can share resources. Those features were implemented as subsystems.

GCOS-3 soon acquired a proper TP monitor called Transaction Driven System (TDS). TDS was essentially a Honeywell development. It later evolved into TP8 on GCOS-8. TDS and its developments were commercially successful and predated IBM CICS, which had a very similar architecture.

GCOS-6 and GCOS-4 (ex-GCOS-62) were superseded by Motorola 68000-based minicomputers running Unix and the product lines were discontinued.

In the late 1980s Bull took over Honeywell and Bull's management chose Unix, probably with the intent to move out of hardware into middleware. Bull killed the Boston proposal to port Multics to a platform derived from DPS-6. Very few customers rushed to convert from GCOS to Unix and new machines (of CMOS technology) were still to be introduced in 1997 with GCOS-8. GCOS played a major role in keeping Honeywell a dismal also-ran in the mainframe market.

Some early Unix systems at Bell Labs used GCOS machines for print spooling and various other services. The field added to "/etc/passwd" to carry GCOS ID information was called the "GECOS field" and survives today as the "pw_gecos" member used for the user's full name and other human-ID information.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1998-04-23

Nearby terms:

GCCGCLG-CodeGCOSGCOS Macro Assembler ProgramGCRGCTgd

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GCOS Macro Assembler Program

<language>

(GMAP) The macro assembler for the GCOS 8 operating system on Honeywell/Bull DPS-8 computers.

["GCOS8 OS GMAP User's Guide", Bull].

Last updated: 2009-01-14

Nearby terms:

GCLG-CodeGCOSGCOS Macro Assembler ProgramGCRGCTgdGDA

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GCR

Group Code Recording

Nearby terms:

G-CodeGCOSGCOS Macro Assembler ProgramGCRGCTgdGDAGDB

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GCT

<programming, tool>

A test-coverage tool by Brian Marick <marick@testing.com>, based on GNU C. Version 1.4 was ported to Sun-3, Sun-4, RS/6000, 68000, 88000, HP-PA, IBM 3090, Ultrix, Convex, SCO but not Linux, Solaris, or Microsoft Windows.

Commercial support is available from the author (+1 217 351 7228).

ftp://cs.uiuc.edu/pub/testing/gct.file/.

Last updated: 1999-07-08

Nearby terms:

GCOSGCOS Macro Assembler ProgramGCRGCTgdGDAGDBGDBPSK

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gd

<networking>

The country code for Grenada.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

GCOS Macro Assembler ProgramGCRGCTgdGDAGDBGDBPSKGödel, Kurt

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GDA

<application>

(Genetic Data Analysis) A program by Paul O. Lewis and Dmitri Zaykin, designed to accompany the referenced book, that computes linkage and hardy-weinberg disequilibrium and some genetic distances, and provides method-of-moments estimators for hierarchical F-statistics.

A command-line version by Chris Basten runs under Mac OS.

["Genetic Data Analysis" by Bruce S. Weir, 1996, Sinaur Associates].

Last updated: 2009-10-15

Nearby terms:

GCOS Macro Assembler ProgramGCRGCTgdGDAGDBGDBPSKGödel, KurtGDI

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GDB

<programming, tool>

GNU debugger. The FSF's source-level debugger for C, C++ and other languages. Developed by many people but most recently Fred Fish <fnf@cygnus.com>, Stu Grossman <grossman@cygnus.com> and John Gilmore <gnu@cygnus.com> all of Cygnus Support. GDB fills the same niche as dbx. Programs must be compiled to include debugging symbols.

Version 4.11. Distributed under GNU CopyLeft. It runs on most Unix variants, VMS, VXWorks, Amiga and MS-DOS.

FTP gdb-*.tar.[zZ] from a GNU archive site. E-mail: <bug-gdb@gnu.org> (bug reports).

Last updated: 1993-10-29

Nearby terms:

GCOS Macro Assembler ProgramGCRGCTgdGDAGDBGDBPSKGödel, KurtGDIGDMOGDPL

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GDBPSK

Gaussian Differential Binary Phase-Shift Keying

Nearby terms:

GCRGCTgdGDAGDBGDBPSKGödel, KurtGDIGDMOGDPLGEge

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gödel, Kurt

Kurt Gödel

Nearby terms:

GCTgdGDAGDBGDBPSKGödel, KurtGDIGDMOGDPLGEgeGE-645

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GDI

Graphic Display Interface

Nearby terms:

gdGDAGDBGDBPSKGödel, KurtGDIGDMOGDPLGEgeGE-645

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GDMO

Guidelines for the Definition of Managed Objects.

A standard (ISO/IEC 10165-4) for defining data models on ASN.1

Nearby terms:

GDAGDBGDBPSKGödel, KurtGDIGDMOGDPLGEgeGE-645GEA

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GDPL

Generalized Distributed Programming Language. "GDPL - A Generalized Distributed Programming Language", K. Ng et al, Proc 4th Intl Conf Distrib Comp Sys, IEEE 1984, pp.69-78.

Nearby terms:

GDBGDBPSKGödel, KurtGDIGDMOGDPLGEgeGE-645GEAGEANT

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GE

General Electric

Nearby terms:

GDBPSKGödel, KurtGDIGDMOGDPLGEgeGE-645GEAGEANTGECOM

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

ge

<networking>

The country code for Georgia.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

Gödel, KurtGDIGDMOGDPLGEgeGE-645GEAGEANTGECOMGECOS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GE-645

<computer>

A computer built by General Electric, the successor to the GE-635, designed to provide the extra CPU features required by the Multics project.

The GE-645 was designed in 1965 by John Couleur and Edward Glaser at MIT. It had several security levels and instructions for handling virtual memory. Addressing used an 18-bit segment in addition to the 18-bit address, dramatically increasing the theoretical memory size and making virtual memory easier to support.

Design of the GE-645's successor, the GE-655, started in 1967.

Last updated: 2006-09-24

Nearby terms:

GDIGDMOGDPLGEgeGE-645GEAGEANTGECOMGECOSGedanken

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEA

Graph Extended ALGOL. Extension of ALGOL 60 for graph manipulation, on UNIVAC 1108. "A Language for Treating Graphs", S. Crespi-Reghizzi et al, CACM 13(5) (May 1970).

Nearby terms:

GDPLGEgeGE-645GEAGEANTGECOMGECOSGedankengedanken

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEANT

A simulation, tracking and drawing package for HEP.

Nearby terms:

GEgeGE-645GEAGEANTGECOMGECOSGedankengedankengeef

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GECOM

<language>

A language for the GE-255 series, like COBOL with some ALGOL features added, in use around 1964-5. GECOM included many of the early COBOL constructs including report writer and TABSOL (programming by truth table). Another (planned but unimplemented?) component was FRINGE.

[Sammet 1969, p. 329].

[Dates?]

Last updated: 1996-09-15

Nearby terms:

geGE-645GEAGEANTGECOMGECOSGedankengedankengeefgeek

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GECOS

GCOS

Nearby terms:

GE-645GEAGEANTGECOMGECOSGedankengedankengeefgeekgeek out

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gedanken

John Reynolds, 1970. "GEDANKEN - A Simple Typeless Language Based on the Principle of Completeness and the Reference Concept", J.C. Reynolds, CACM 13(5):308-319 (May 1970).

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

GEAGEANTGECOMGECOSGedankengedankengeefgeekgeek outGEI

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gedanken

/g*-dahn'kn/ Ungrounded; impractical; not well-thought-out; untried; untested.

"Gedanken" is a German word for "thought". A thought experiment is one you carry out in your head. In physics, the term "gedanken experiment" is used to refer to an experiment that is impractical to carry out, but useful to consider because it can be reasoned about theoretically. (A classic gedanken experiment of relativity theory involves thinking about a man in an elevator accelerating through space.) Gedanken experiments are very useful in physics, but must be used with care. It's too easy to idealise away some important aspect of the real world in constructing the "apparatus".

Among hackers, accordingly, the word has a pejorative connotation. It is typically used of a project, especially one in artificial intelligence research, that is written up in grand detail (typically as a Ph.D. thesis) without ever being implemented to any great extent. Such a project is usually perpetrated by people who aren't very good hackers or find programming distasteful or are just in a hurry. A "gedanken thesis" is usually marked by an obvious lack of intuition about what is programmable and what is not, and about what does and does not constitute a clear specification of an algorithm. See also AI-complete, DWIM.

Nearby terms:

GEANTGECOMGECOSGedankengedankengeefgeekgeek outGEIGE Information Services

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

geef

(Ostensibly from "gefingerpoken") mung.

See also blinkenlights.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-01-18

Nearby terms:

GECOSGedankengedankengeefgeekgeek outGEIGE Information Services

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

geek

computer geek

Nearby terms:

Gedankengedankengeefgeekgeek outGEIGE Information Services

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

geek out

To temporarily enter techno-nerd mode while in a non-hackish context, for example at parties held near computer equipment. Especially used when you need to do or say something highly technical and don't have time to explain: "Pardon me while I geek out for a moment."

See computer geek, propeller head.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-01-18

Nearby terms:

gedankengeefgeekgeek outGEIGE Information ServicesGEM

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEI

A German software engineering company.

Nearby terms:

geefgeekgeek outGEIGE Information ServicesGEMgengender mender

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GE Information Services

<networking, company>

One of the leading on-line services, started on 1st October 1985, providing subscribers with hundreds of special interest areas, computer hardware and software support, award-winning multi-player games, the most software files in the industry (over 200 000), worldwide news, sports updates, business news, investment strategies, and Internet electronic mail and fax (GE Mail). Interactive conversations (Chat Lines) and bulletin boards (Round Tables) with associated software archives are also provided.

GEnie databases (through the ARTIST gateway) allow users to search the full text of thousands of publications, including Dun & Bradstreet Company Profiles; a GEnie NewsStand with more than 900 newspapers, magazines, and newsletters; a Reference Center with information ranging from Agriculture to World History; the latest in medical information from MEDLINE; and patent and trademark registrations.

http://genie.com/. Shopping 2000.

Telephone: +1 (800) 638 9636.

TDD: +1 (800) 238 9172.

E-mail: <info@genie.geis.com>.

[Connection with: GE Information Services, Inc., a division of General Electric Company, Headquarters: Rockville, Maryland, USA?]

Last updated: 1995-04-13

Nearby terms:

geekgeek outGEIGE Information ServicesGEMgengender mender

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEM

<operating system>

One of the first commercially available GUIs. Borrowing heavily from the Macintosh WIMP-style interface it was available for both the IBM compatible market (being packaged with Amstrad's original PC series) and more successfully for the Atari ST range. The PC version was produced by Digital Research (more famous for DR-DOS, their MS-DOS clone), and was not developed very far. The Atari version, however, continued to be developed until the early 1990s and the later versions supported 24-bit colour modes, full colour icons and a nice looking sculpted 3D interface.

Last updated: 1997-01-10

Nearby terms:

GEIGE Information ServicesGEMgengender menderGene Amdahl

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gen

generate

Nearby terms:

GE Information ServicesGEMgengender menderGene AmdahlGeneral Activities Simulation Program

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gender mender

<hardware>

(Or "gender bender", "gender blender", "sex changer", and even "homosexual adaptor") A cable connector shell with either two male or two female connectors on it, used to correct the mismatches that result when some loser didn't understand the EIA-232C specification and the distinction between DTE and DCE. Used especially for EIA-232C parts in either the original D-25 or the IBM PC's D-9 connector.

There appears to be some confusion as to whether a "male homosexual adaptor" has pins on both sides (is doubly male) or sockets on both sides (connects two males).

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-04-16

Nearby terms:

gengender menderGene AmdahlGeneral Activities Simulation Program

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gene Amdahl

<person>

A former IBM engineer who founded Amdahl Corporation.

Last updated: 1995-05-23

Nearby terms:

gender menderGene AmdahlGeneral Activities Simulation Program

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Activities Simulation Program

<simulation, library>

(GASP) A set of discrete system simulation subroutines for Fortran.

Last updated: 2003-09-27

Nearby terms:

General Activities Simulation ProgramGeneral Aerodynamic Simulation Program

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Aerodynamic Simulation Program

<simulation>

(GASP)

http://aerosft.com/Gasp/References/main.php3.

[Summary?]

Last updated: 2003-09-27

Nearby terms:

General Aerodynamic Simulation ProgramGeneral Dynamics Canada Ltd

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Dynamics Canada Ltd

<company>

A Canadian defence electronics company that makes direct and indirect fire control systems, vehicle electronics, reconnaissance vehicle surveillance systems, computerised laser sight for anti-tank weapons, tactical communication systems, headquarters information distribution system, tactical voice and distribution systems, acoustic signal processing, ASW mission systems, sonobuoy processors, active sonar systems, towed array sonar systems, tactical acoustic trainer, Mil-Spec electroluminiscent displays, large multi-sensor displays, coastal intrusion detection systems and fibre-optic distribution systems.

The company was founded in 1948 as "Computing Devices Canada Ltd.", part of the Ceridian group of companies. It was renamed General Dynamics Canada Ltd. on 2002-01-01.

General Dynamics Canada.

Last updated: 2013-01-20

Nearby terms:

General Aerodynamic Simulation ProgramGeneral Dynamics Canada LtdGeneral Electric

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Electric

<company>

(GE) A US company that manufactured computers from 1956 until 1970, when it sold its computer division to Honeywell and left the computer business. Notable GE computers were the GE-265, which supported the Dartmouth Time-sharing System (DTSS), and the GE-645 used for Multics development.

See also GCOS.

Not to be confused with the General Electric Company (GEC) in the UK (where FOLDOC's first seeds were sown).

Last updated: 2002-02-27

Nearby terms:

General ElectricGeneral Electric Comprehensive Operating System

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Electric Comprehensive Operating System

GCOS

Nearby terms:

General Electric Comprehensive Operating SystemGeneral Magic

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Magic

A software company based in Mountain View, California. Products released in 1994 after four years in development include: Telescript - a communications-oriented programming language; Magic Cap - an OOPS designed for PDAs; and a new, third generation GUI. Motorola's Envoy, due for release in the third quarter of 1994, will use Magic Cap as its OS.

What PostScript did for cross-platform, device-independent documents, Telescript aims to do for cross-platform, network-independent messaging. Telescript protects programmers from many of the complexities of network protocols.

Competitors for Magic Cap include Microsoft's Windows for Pens/Winpad, PenPoint, Apple Computer's Newton Intelligence and GEOS by GeoWorks.

http://genmagic.com/.

Last updated: 1995-02-23

Nearby terms:

General Electric Comprehensive Operating SystemGeneral MagicGeneral Packet Radio Service

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Packet Radio Service

<communications>

(GPRS) A GSM data transmission technique that does not set up a continuous channel from a portable terminal for the transmission and reception of data, but transmits and receives data in packets. It makes very efficient use of available radio spectrum, and users pay only for the volume of data sent and received.

See also: packet radio.

Last updated: 1999-09-12

Nearby terms:

General MagicGeneral Packet Radio ServiceGeneral Protection Failure

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Protection Failure

(GPF, or General Protection Fault) An addressing error, caught by the processor's memory protection hardware, that cannot be attributed to any expected condition such as a page fault.

Last updated: 1995-03-28

Nearby terms:

General Packet Radio ServiceGeneral Protection FailureGeneral Protection Fault

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Protection Fault

General Protection Failure

Nearby terms:

General Protection FailureGeneral Protection FaultGeneral Public Licence

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Public Licence

<spelling>

It's spelled "General Public License".

(In the UK, "licence" is a noun and "license" is a verb (like "advice"/"advise") but in the US both are spelled "license").

Last updated: 1995-05-12

Nearby terms:

General Protection FaultGeneral Public LicenceGeneral Public License

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Public License

<legal>

(GPL, note US spelling) The licence applied to most software from the Free Software Foundation and the GNU project and other authors who choose to use it.

The licences for most software are designed to prevent users from sharing or changing it. By contrast, the GNU General Public License is intended to guarantee the freedom to share and change free software - to make sure the software is free for all its users. The GPL is designed to make sure that anyone can distribute copies of free software (and charge for this service if they wish); that they receive source code or can get it if they want; that they can change the software or use pieces of it in new free programs; and that they know they can do these things. The GPL forbids anyone to deny others these rights or to ask them to surrender the rights. These restrictions translate to certain responsibilities for those who distribute copies of the software or modify it.

See also General Public Virus.

Last updated: 1994-10-27

Nearby terms:

General Public LicenceGeneral Public LicenseGeneral Public Virus

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Public Virus

<software, legal>

A pejorative name for some versions of the GNU project copyleft or General Public License (GPL), which requires that any tools or application programs incorporating copylefted code must be source-distributed on the same terms as GNU code. Thus it is alleged that the copyleft "infects" software generated with GNU tools, which may in turn infect other software that reuses any of its code.

Copyright law limits the scope of the GPL to "programs textually incorporating significant amounts of GNU code" so GPL is only passed on if actual GNU source is transmitted. This used to be the case with the Bison parser skeleton until its licence was fixed.

http://org.gnu.de/manual/bison/html_chapter/bison_2.html#SEC2.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1999-07-14

Nearby terms:

General Public LicenseGeneral Public VirusGeneral Purpose Graphic Language

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Purpose Graphic Language

["A General Purpose Graphic Language", H.E. Kulsrud, CACM 11(4) (Apr 1968)].

Nearby terms:

General Purpose Graphic LanguageGeneral Purpose Interface Bus

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Purpose Interface Bus

IEEE 488

Nearby terms:

General Purpose Graphic LanguageGeneral Purpose Interface BusGeneral Purpose Language

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Purpose Language

(GPL) An ALGOL 60 variant with user-definable types and operators.

[Sammet 1969, p. 195].

["The GPL Language", J.V. Garwick et al, TER-05, CDC, Palo Alto 1969].

Nearby terms:

General Purpose Interface BusGeneral Purpose LanguageGeneral Purpose Macro-generator

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Purpose Macro-generator

<language>

(GPM) An early text-processing language similar to TRAC, implemented on the Atlas 2 by Christopher Strachey.

["A General Purpose Macrogenerator", C. Strachey, Computer J 8(3):225-241, Oct 1965].

Last updated: 2006-07-21

Nearby terms:

General Purpose LanguageGeneral Purpose Macro-generatorGeneral Recursion Theorem

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

General Recursion Theorem

<mathematics>

Cantor's theorem, originally stated for ordinals, which extends inductive proof to recursive construction. The proof is by pasting together "attempts" (partial solutions).

[Better explanation?]

Last updated: 1995-06-15

Nearby terms:

General Purpose Macro-generatorGeneral Recursion Theoremgenerate

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

generate

To produce something according to an algorithm or program or set of rules, or as a (possibly unintended) side effect of the execution of an algorithm or program.

The opposite of parse.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-06-15

Nearby terms:

General Recursion TheoremgenerategenerationGeneric Array Logic

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

generation

An attempt to classify the degree of sophistication of programming languages.

See First generation language -- Fifth generation language.

Last updated: 1995-06-15

Nearby terms:

generategenerationGeneric Array LogicGeneric Expert System Tool

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Generic Array Logic

<hardware, integrated circuit>

(GAL) A newer kind of Programmable Array Logic based on EEPROM storage cells, been pioneered by Lattice. GALs can be erased and reprogrammed and usually replace a whole set of different PALs (hence the name).

Last updated: 1995-12-09

Nearby terms:

generationGeneric Array LogicGeneric Expert System Toolgeneric identifier

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Generic Expert System Tool

<artificial intelligence>

(GEST) An expert system shell for Symbolics Lisp machine, with frames, forward chaining, backward chaining and fuzzy logic; written by John Gilmore(?) at GA Tech.

Latest version: 4.0, as of 1995-04-16.

ftp://ftp.gatech.edu/pub/ai/gest.tar.Z.

Last updated: 1995-04-16

Nearby terms:

Generic Array LogicGeneric Expert System Toolgeneric identifier

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

generic identifier

<language, text>

A string constituting the name of a element in an SGML document.

Last updated: 2001-01-31

Nearby terms:

Generic Expert System Toolgeneric identifiergenericitygeneric markup

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

genericity

<programming>

The possibility for a language to provided parameterised modules or types. E.g. List(of:Integer) or List(of:People).

Last updated: 1996-05-19

Nearby terms:

generic identifiergenericitygeneric markupgeneric programming

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

generic markup

<text>

In computerised document preparation, a method of adding information to the text indicating the logical components of a document, such as paragraphs, headers or footnotes. SGML is an example of such a system. Specific instructions for layout of the text on the page do not appear in the markup.

Last updated: 1996-05-19

Nearby terms:

genericitygeneric markupgeneric programmingGeneric Routing Encapsulation

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

generic programming

<programming>

A programming technique which aims to make programs more adaptable by making them more general. Generic programs often embody non-traditional kinds of polymorphism; ordinary programs are obtained from them by suitably instantiating their parameters. In contrast with normal programs, the parameters of a generic programs are often quite rich in structure. For example they may be other programs, types or type constructors or even programming paradigms.

Last updated: 1997-11-22

Nearby terms:

generic markupgeneric programmingGeneric Routing Encapsulation

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Generic Routing Encapsulation

<networking, protocol>

(GRE) A protocol which allows an arbitrary network protocol A to be transmitted over any other arbitrary network protocol B, by encapsulating the packets of A within GRE packets, which in turn are contained within packets of B.

Defined in RFC 1701 and RFC 1702 (GRE over IP).

Last updated: 1998-07-19

Nearby terms:

Generic Routing EncapsulationGeneric Security Service Application Programming Interface

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Generic Security Service Application Programming Interface

<security, programming>

(GSS-API) An application level interface (API) to system security services. It provides a generic interface to services which may be provided by a variety of different security mechanisms. Vanilla GSS-API supports security contexts between two entities (known as "principals").

GSS-API is a draft internet standard which is being developed in the Common Authentication Technology Working Group (cat-wg) of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).

Initial specifications for GSS-API appeared in RFC 1508 and RFC 1509. Subsequent revisions appeared in several draft standards documents.

http://dstc.qut.edu.au/~barton/work/project.html.

Last updated: 1996-05-19

Nearby terms:

Generic Security Service Application Programming Interfacegeneric thunk

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

generic thunk

<programming>

A software mechanism that allows a 16-bit Windows application to load and call a Win32 DLL under Windows NT and Windows 95.

See also flat thunk, universal thunk.

Last updated: 1999-04-05

Nearby terms:

Generic Security Service Application Programming Interfacegeneric thunkgeneric type variable

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

generic type variable

<programming>

(Also known as a "schematic type variable"). Different occurrences of a generic type variable in a type expression may be instantiated to different types. Thus, in the expression

	let id x = x in
	(id True, id 1)

id's type is (for all a: a -> a). The universal quantifier "for all a:" means that a is a generic type variable. For the two uses of id, a is instantiated to Bool and Int. Compare this with

	let id x = x in
	let f g = (g True, g 1) in
	f id

This looks similar but f has no legal Hindley-Milner type. If we say

	f :: (a -> b) -> (b, b)

this would permit g's type to be any instance of (a -> b) rather than requiring it to be at least as general as (a -> b). Furthermore, it constrains both instances of g to have the same result type whereas they do not. The type variables a and b in the above are implicitly quantified at the top level:

	f :: for all a: for all b: (a -> b) -> (b, b)

so instantiating them (removing the quantifiers) can only be done once, at the top level. To correctly describe the type of f requires that they be locally quantified:

	f :: ((for all a: a) -> (for all b: b)) -> (c, d)

which means that each time g is applied, a and b may be instantiated differently. f's actual argument must have a type at least as general as ((for all a: a) -> (for all b: b)), and may not be some less general instance of this type. Type variables c and d are still implicitly quantified at the top level and, now that g's result type is a generic type variable, any types chosen for c and d are guaranteed to be instances of it.

This type for f does not express the fact that b only needs to be at least as general as the types c and d. For example, if c and d were both Bool then any function of type (for all a: a -> Bool) would be a suitable argument to f but it would not match the above type for f.

Nearby terms:

generic thunkgeneric type variableGenesiagenetic algorithm

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Genesia

An expert system developed by Electricite de France and commercialised by STERIA (Paris).

Nearby terms:

generic type variableGenesiagenetic algorithmgenetic algorithms

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

genetic algorithm

(GA) An evolutionary algorithm which generates each individual from some encoded form known as a "chromosome" or "genome". Chromosomes are combined or mutated to breed new individuals. "Crossover", the kind of recombination of chromosomes found in sexual reproduction in nature, is often also used in GAs. Here, an offspring's chromosome is created by joining segments choosen alternately from each of two parents' chromosomes which are of fixed length.

GAs are useful for multidimensional optimisation problems in which the chromosome can encode the values for the different variables being optimised.

Illinois Genetic Algorithms Laboratory (IlliGAL).

Last updated: 1995-02-03

Nearby terms:

Genesiagenetic algorithmgenetic algorithmsgenetic programming

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

genetic algorithms

genetic algorithm

Nearby terms:

genetic algorithmgenetic algorithmsgenetic programmingGEnie Services

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

genetic programming

<programming>

(GP) A programming technique which extends the genetic algorithm to the domain of whole computer programs. In GP, populations of programs are genetically bred to solve problems. Genetic programming can solve problems of system identification, classification, control, robotics, optimisation, game playing, and pattern recognition.

Starting with a primordial ooze of hundreds or thousands of randomly created programs composed of functions and terminals appropriate to the problem, the population is progressively evolved over a series of generations by applying the operations of Darwinian fitness proportionate reproduction and crossover (sexual recombination).

Last updated: 1995-03-31

Nearby terms:

genetic algorithmsgenetic programmingGEnie ServicesGenken Programming Language

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEnie Services

GE Information Services

Nearby terms:

genetic programmingGEnie ServicesGenken Programming Language

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Genken Programming Language

<language>

(GPL) A variant of PL360 by K. Asai of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute.

["Experience With GPL", K. Asai, in Machine Oriented Higher Level Languages, W. van der Poel, N-H 1974, pp. 371-376].

Last updated: 1995-04-13

Nearby terms:

genetic programmingGEnie ServicesGenken Programming LanguageGENOVAgensym

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GENOVA

An old statistical package still in use on some VM computers.

Last updated: 1995-11-28

Nearby terms:

Genken Programming LanguageGENOVAgensymGensym Corporation

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gensym

<library>

/jen'sim/ (From the MacLISP for "generated symbol") To invent a new name for something temporary, in such a way that the name is almost certainly not in conflict with one already in use.

The canonical form of a gensym is "Gnnnn" where nnnn represents a number; any LISP hacker would recognise G0093 (for example) as a gensym. Gensymmed names are useful for storing or uniquely identifying crufties.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1999-10-31

Nearby terms:

Genken Programming LanguageGENOVAgensymGensym CorporationGensym Standard Interface

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gensym Corporation

<company>

A company that supplies software and services for intelligent operations management. Common applications include quality management, process optimisation, dynamic scheduling, network management, energy and environmental management, and process modelling and simulation.

Their products include G2.

http://gensym.com/.

Last updated: 1999-10-31

Nearby terms:

gensymGensym CorporationGensym Standard InterfaceGentleman's Portable Coroutine System

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gensym Standard Interface

<programming>

(GSI) A set of C libraries and programming tools used to interface G2 to external systems. Commercially available bridges are available to SCADA systems and PLCs.

Last updated: 1997-02-11

Nearby terms:

Gensym Standard InterfaceGentleman's Portable Coroutine System

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gentleman's Portable Coroutine System

A coroutine package in Fortran.

["A Portable Coroutine System", W.M. Gentleman, Info Proc 71, C.V. Freiman ed, 1972].

Last updated: 1995-02-01

Nearby terms:

Gensym Standard InterfaceGentleman's Portable Coroutine SystemGEN-X

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEN-X

An expert system developed by General Electric.

Nearby terms:

Gentleman's Portable Coroutine SystemGEN-XGeographical Information System

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Geographical Information System

Geographic Information System

[Which is more common?]

Last updated: 1995-12-21

Nearby terms:

Geographical Information SystemGeographic Information System

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Geographic Information System

<application>

(GIS) A computer system for capturing, storing, checking, integrating, manipulating, analysing and displaying data related to positions on the Earth's surface. Typically, a GIS is used for handling maps of one kind or another. These might be represented as several different layers where each layer holds data about a particular kind of feature (e.g. roads). Each feature is linked to a position on the graphical image of a map.

Layers of data are organised to be studied and to perform statistical analysis (i.e. a layer of customer locations could include fields for Name, Address, Contact, Number, Area). Uses are primarily government related, town planning, local authority and public utility management, environmental, resource management, engineering, business, marketing, and distribution.

GIS dictionary.

http://ncl.ac.uk/~ngraphic/wotzagis.html.

Last updated: 1995-12-21

Nearby terms:

Geographical Information SystemGeographic Information Systemgeometric mean

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

geometric mean

<mathematics>

The Nth root of the product of N numbers.

If each number in a list of numbers was replaced with their geometric mean, then multiplying them all together would still give the same result. The geometric mean thus gives an average "factor" in a context where numbers are multiplied together, e.g. compound interest.

Wolfram.

Last updated: 2007-03-16

Nearby terms:

Geographic Information Systemgeometric meanGEORGEGEORGE 3

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEORGE

<language>

One of the earliest programming languages, developed by Charles Hamblin in 1957. GEORGE was a stack oriented language, using reverse Polish notation. It was implemented on the English Electric DEUCE.

["GEORGE: A Semi-Translation Programming Scheme for the DEUCE, Programming and Operations Manual", C. L. Hamblin, U New S Wales, 1958].

["Computer Languages", C.L. Hamblin, Aust J Sci 20(5):135-139, Dec 1957 and Aust Comp J 17(4):195-198, Nov 1985]

Last updated: 2007-03-18

Nearby terms:

Geographic Information Systemgeometric meanGEORGEGEORGE 3George Boole

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEORGE 3

<operating system>

The operating system for the ICL 1900 mainframe. Lots of two-letter commands.

Last updated: 2003-09-20

Nearby terms:

geometric meanGEORGEGEORGE 3George BooleGeorg Simon Ohm

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

George Boole

<person>

1815-11-02 - 2008-05-11 22:58 best known for his contribution to symbolic logic (Boolean Algebra) but also active in other fields such as probability theory, algebra, analysis, and differential equations. He lived, taught, and is buried in Cork City, Ireland. The Boole library at University College Cork is named after him.

For centuries philosophers have studied logic, which is orderly and precise reasoning. George Boole argued in 1847 that logic should be allied with mathematics rather than with philosophy.

Demonstrating logical principles with mathematical symbols instead of words, he founded symbolic logic, a field of mathematical/philosophical study. In the new discipline he developed, known as Boolean algebra, all objects are divided into separate classes, each with a given property; each class may be described in terms of the presence or absence of the same property. An electrical circuit, for example, is either on or off. Boolean algebra has been applied in the design of binary computer circuits and telephone switching equipment. These devices make use of Boole's two-valued (presence or absence of a property) system.

Born in Lincoln, Lincolnshire, UK, George Boole was the son of a tradesman and was largely self-taught. He began teaching at the age of 16 to help support his family. In his spare time he read mathematical journals and soon began to write articles for them. By the age of 29, Boole had received a gold medal for his work from the British Royal Society. His 'Mathematical Analysis of Logic', a pamphlet published in 1847, contained his first statement of the principles of symbolic logic. Two years later he was appointed professor of mathematics at Queen's College in Ireland, even though he had never studied at a university.

He died in Ballintemple, Ireland, on 1864-12-08.

Compton's Encyclopedia Online.

Last updated: 1998-11-19

Nearby terms:

geometric meanGEORGEGEORGE 3George BooleGeorg Simon OhmGEOSGEPURS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Georg Simon Ohm

<person>

(1789-1854) A German physicist who became Professor of Physics at Munich University, after whom the unit of electrical resistance was named.

Last updated: 2003-12-02

Nearby terms:

GEORGEGEORGE 3George BooleGeorg Simon OhmGEOSGEPURSGerald

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEOS

A small windowing, microkernel (less than 64 kbytes long) operating system written in heavily bummed assembly language for MS-DOS computers. It multitasks rather nicely on a 6 Mhz Intel 80286 with at least 512K memory.

It was adapted to PDAs by adding pen recognition, which doesn't work very well.

Usenet newsgroup: comp.os.geos.

Last updated: 1995-01-21

Nearby terms:

George BooleGeorg Simon OhmGEOSGEPURSGeraldGerald Sussman

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEPURS

An early system on the IBM 701.

[Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959)].

Last updated: 1995-01-21

Nearby terms:

George BooleGeorg Simon OhmGEOSGEPURSGeraldGerald SussmanGerman

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gerald

["Gerald: An Exceptional Lazy Functional Programming Language", A.C. Reeves et al, in Functional Programming, Glasgow 1989, K. Davis et al eds, Springer 1990].

Last updated: 1995-01-10

Nearby terms:

Georg Simon OhmGEOSGEPURSGeraldGerald SussmanGermanGEST

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gerald Sussman

<person>

(Gerald J. Sussman, Jerry) A noted hacker at MIT and one of the developers of SCHEME and 6.001.

http://martigny.ai.mit.edu/~gjs/gjs.html.

Last updated: 1996-11-29

Nearby terms:

GEOSGEPURSGeraldGerald SussmanGermanGESTGet a life!Get a real computer!

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

German

<human language>

\j*r'mn\ A human language written (in latin alphabet) and spoken in Germany, Austria and parts of Switzerland.

German writing normally uses four non-ASCII characters: "ä", "ö" and "ü" have "umlauts" (two dots over the top) and "ß" is a double-S ("scharfes S") which looks like the Greek letter beta (except in capitalised words where it should be written "SS"). These can be written in ASCII in several ways, the most common are ae, oe ue AE OE UE ss or sz and the TeX versions "a "o "u "A "O "U "s.

See also ABEND, blinkenlights, DAU, DIN, gedanken, GMD, kluge.

Usenet newsgroup: soc.culture.german. ftp://src.doc.ic.ac.uk/usenet/news-info/soc.answers/german-faq, ftp://alice.fmi.uni-passau.de/pub/dictionaries/german.dat.Z.

Last updated: 1995-03-31

Nearby terms:

GeraldGerald SussmanGermanGESTGet a life!Get a real computer!

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GEST

Generic Expert System Tool

Nearby terms:

Gerald SussmanGermanGESTGet a life!Get a real computer!

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Get a life!

<abuse>

Standard way of suggesting that someone has succumbed to terminal geekdom. Often heard on Usenet, especially as a way of suggesting that the target is taking some obscure issue of theology too seriously. This exhortation was popularised by William Shatner on a "Saturday Night Live" episode in a speech that ended "Get a *life*!", but some respondents believe it to have been in use before then. It was certainly in wide use among hackers for at least five years before achieving mainstream currency in early 1992.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-01-18

Nearby terms:

Gerald SussmanGermanGESTGet a life!Get a real computer!get.comgetty

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Get a real computer!

<jargon>

A typical hacker response to news that somebody is having trouble getting work done on a toy system or bitty box.

The threshold for "real computer" rises with time. As of mid-1993 it meant multi-tasking, with a hard disk, and an address space bigger than 16 megabytes. At this time, according to GLS, computers with character-only displays were verging on "unreal". In 2001, a real computer has a one gigahertz processor, 128 MB of RAM, 20 GB of hard disk, and runs Linux.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 2001-06-22

Nearby terms:

GermanGESTGet a life!Get a real computer!get.comgettygf

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

get.com

<operating system>

A command which can be created using debug in MS DOS to set the errorlevel according to which key is pressed. The errorlevel can then be interrogated from a batch file by a series of commands like this:

 get
 if errorlevel 118 goto E118
 if errorlevel 117 goto E117
 if errorlevel 116 goto E116
 if errorlevel 115 goto E115
 if errorlevel 114 goto E114

where E118 etc. are labels in the batch file.

Last updated: 1996-02-01

Nearby terms:

GESTGet a life!Get a real computer!get.comgettygfGFDL

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

getty

<operating system>

A Unix program which sets terminal type, modes, speed and line discipline for a serial port, and is used in the login process.

Last updated: 1996-12-08

Nearby terms:

Get a life!Get a real computer!get.comgettygfGFDLg file

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gf

<networking>

The country code for French Guiana.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

Get a real computer!get.comgettygfGFDLg fileGFLOPSGFR

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GFDL

GNU Free Documentation License

Nearby terms:

Get a real computer!get.comgettygfGFDLg fileGFLOPSGFRGFS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

g file

<messaging>

(General file) A mid 1980s term for text files, usually short and unpublished found on BBSs. The g-files section on BBSs contain text files of general interest, viewable on-line; this is as opposed to files in the file transfer section, which are generally downloadable but not viewable on-line.

When used on the Internet, this term generally refers to the types of file most often associated with old BBSs such as instructions on phreaking or making bombs.

Last updated: 1996-06-20

Nearby terms:

Get a real computer!get.comgettygfGFDLg fileGFLOPSGFRGFSghGHC

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GFLOPS

gigaflops

Nearby terms:

get.comgettygfGFDLg fileGFLOPSGFRGFSghGHCghetto code

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GFR

Grim File Reaper

Nearby terms:

gettygfGFDLg fileGFLOPSGFRGFSghGHCghetto codeghost

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GFS

Grandfather, Father, Son

Nearby terms:

GFDLg fileGFLOPSGFRGFSghGHCghetto codeghostGhostscript

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gh

<networking>

The country code for Ghana.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

g fileGFLOPSGFRGFSghGHCghetto codeghostGhostscript

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GHC

<language>

1. Guarded horn clauses.

2. Glasgow Haskell Compiler.

Last updated: 1999-01-05

Nearby terms:

GFLOPSGFRGFSghGHCghetto codeghostGhostscriptghostview

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

ghetto code

<humour, programming>

A particularly inelegant and obviously suboptimal section of code that still meets the original requirements.

[Dodgy Coder].

Last updated: 2014-05-14

Nearby terms:

GFRGFSghGHCghetto codeghostGhostscriptghostviewGHz

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

ghost

<chat>

(Or "zombie") The image of a user's session on IRC and similar systems, left when the session has been terminated (properly or, often, improperly) but the server (or the network at large) believes the connection is still active and belongs to a real user.

Compare clonebot.

Last updated: 1997-04-07

Nearby terms:

GFSghGHCghetto codeghostGhostscriptghostviewGHzGI

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Ghostscript

<graphics, tool>

The GNU interpreter for PostScript and PDF, with previewers for serval systems and many fonts. Ghostscript was originally written by L. Peter Deutsch <ghost@aladdin.com> of Aladdin Enterprises. The first public release was v1.0 on 1988-08-11.

Latest version: 8.11, as of 2003-08-29.

GNU Home.

News & community.

Last updated: 2003-09-24

Nearby terms:

ghGHCghetto codeghostGhostscriptghostviewGHzGIgi

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

ghostview

An X Window System interface to the ghostscript PostScript interpreter.

Nearby terms:

ghetto codeghostGhostscriptghostviewGHzGIgiGibson, William

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GHz

GigaHertz

Nearby terms:

ghostGhostscriptghostviewGHzGIgiGibson, Williamgid

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GI

generic identifier

Nearby terms:

ghostGhostscriptghostviewGHzGIgiGibson, WilliamgidGIF

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gi

<networking>

The country code for Gibraltar.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

GhostscriptghostviewGHzGIgiGibson, WilliamgidGIFGIF89

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gibson, William

William Gibson

Nearby terms:

ghostviewGHzGIgiGibson, WilliamgidGIFGIF89GIF89aGIFF

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gid

<operating system>

1. group identifier.

<filename extension>

2. global index.

Last updated: 1997-01-30

Nearby terms:

ghostviewGHzGIgiGibson, WilliamgidGIFGIF89GIF89aGIFFgig

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIF

Graphics Interchange Format

Nearby terms:

GIgiGibson, WilliamgidGIFGIF89GIF89aGIFFgiggiga-

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIF89

Graphics Interchange Format

Nearby terms:

giGibson, WilliamgidGIFGIF89GIF89aGIFFgiggiga-gigabit

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIF89a

animated GIF

Nearby terms:

Gibson, WilliamgidGIFGIF89GIF89aGIFFgiggiga-gigabit

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIFF

Do you mean GIF or is this some kind of IFF?

Nearby terms:

GIFGIF89GIF89aGIFFgiggiga-gigabitgigabits per second

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gig

gigabyte

Nearby terms:

GIF89GIF89aGIFFgiggiga-gigabitgigabits per secondgigabyte

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

giga-

prefix

Nearby terms:

GIF89aGIFFgiggiga-gigabitgigabits per secondgigabytegigaflop

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gigabit

<unit>

2^30 bits, 1,073,741,824 bits.

See prefix.

Last updated: 1995-11-12

Nearby terms:

GIFFgiggiga-gigabitgigabits per secondgigabytegigaflop

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gigabits per second

<unit>

(Gbps) A unit of information transfer rate equal to one billion bits per second. Note that, while a gigabit is defined as a power of two (2^30 bits), a gigabit per second is defined as a power of ten (10^9 bits per second, which is slightly less) than 2^30).

Last updated: 2004-02-10

Nearby terms:

giga-gigabitgigabits per secondgigabytegigaflopgigaflops

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gigabyte

<unit, data>

(GB or colloquially "gig") A unit of data equal to one billion bytes but see binary prefix for other definitions. A gigabyte is 1000^3 bytes or 1000 megabytes.

A human gene sequence (including all the redundant codons) contains about 1.5 gigabytes of data.

1000 gigabytes are one terabyte.

See prefix.

Human genome data content.

Last updated: 2013-11-03

Nearby terms:

gigabitgigabits per secondgigabytegigaflopgigaflopsGigaHertz

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gigaflop

gigaflops

Nearby terms:

gigabits per secondgigabytegigaflopgigaflopsGigaHertzGIGO

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gigaflops

<unit>

(GFLOPS) One thousand million (10^9) floating point operations per second.

One of them is strictly "one gigaflops" in the same way that one mile per hour isn't 1 MP.

See prefix.

Last updated: 1998-04-19

Nearby terms:

gigabits per secondgigabytegigaflopgigaflopsGigaHertzGIGOgilley

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GigaHertz

<unit>

(GHz) Billions of cycles per second.

The unit of frequency used to measure the clock rate of modern digital logic, including microprocessors.

Last updated: 2001-05-14

Nearby terms:

gigabytegigaflopgigaflopsGigaHertzGIGOgilleygillionGilmore, John

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIGO

Garbage In, Garbage Out

Nearby terms:

gigaflopgigaflopsGigaHertzGIGOgilleygillionGilmore, John

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gilley

<humour>

(Usenet) The unit of analogical bogosity. According to its originator, the standard for one gilley was "the act of bogotoficiously comparing the shutting down of 1000 machines for a day with the killing of one person". The milligilley has been found to suffice for most normal conversational exchanges.

Last updated: 1995-03-17

Nearby terms:

gigaflopsGigaHertzGIGOgilleygillionGilmore, JohnGIM-1

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gillion

<unit>

/gil'y*n/ or /jil'y*n/ (From giga- by analogy with mega/million and tera/trillion) 10^9.

Same as an American billion or a British "milliard". How one pronounces this depends on whether one speaks giga- with a hard or soft "g".

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-03-17

Nearby terms:

gigaflopsGigaHertzGIGOgilleygillionGilmore, JohnGIM-1GINGINA

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gilmore, John

John Gilmore

Nearby terms:

GigaHertzGIGOgilleygillionGilmore, JohnGIM-1GINGINAGinger

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIM-1

Generalized Information Management Language. Nelson, Pick, Andrews. Proc SJCC 29:169-73, AFIPS (Fall 1966).

Nearby terms:

GIGOgilleygillionGilmore, JohnGIM-1GINGINAGingerGIP

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIN

A special-purpose macro assembler used to build the GEORGE 3 operating system for ICL1900 series computers.

Last updated: 1994-11-02

Nearby terms:

gilleygillionGilmore, JohnGIM-1GINGINAGingerGIPGIPS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GINA

Generic Interactive Application. An application framework based on Common Lisp and OSF/Motif, designed to simplify the construction of graphical interactive applications.

GINA consists of CLM - a language binding for OSF/Motif in Common Lisp; the GINA application framework - a class library in CLOS; the GINA interface builder - an interactive tool implemented with GINA to design Motif windows.

Version 2.2 requires OSF/Motif 1.1 or better, Common Lisp with CLX, CLOS, PCL and processes. It runs with Franz Allegro, Lucid, CMU CL and Symbolics Genera.

Germany. N. America. Mailing list: gina-users-request@gmdzi.gmd.de.

Last updated: 1994-11-02

Nearby terms:

gillionGilmore, JohnGIM-1GINGINAGingerGIPGIPSGIRLGIS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Ginger

A simple functional language from the University of Warwick with parallel constructs.

Last updated: 1994-11-02

Nearby terms:

Gilmore, JohnGIM-1GINGINAGingerGIPGIPSGIRLGISGiuseppe Peano

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIP

1. General Interpretive Programme.

A 1956 interpreted language for the English Electric DEUCE, with array operations and an extensive library of numerical methods.

["Interpretive and Brick Schemes, with Special Reference to Matrix Operations", English Electric COmpany, DEUCE News No. 10 (1956)].

Last updated: 1994-11-02

2. An erroneous singular of GIPS.

Nearby terms:

GIM-1GINGINAGingerGIPGIPSGIRLGISGiuseppe PeanoGIYF

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIPS

/gips/ or /jips/ [Analogy with MIPS] Giga-Instructions per Second (or possibly "Gillions of Instructions per Second"; see gillion).

In 1991, this was used of only a handful of highly parallel machines and one sequential processor built with Josephson devices. DEC's Alpha AXP 21164 processor was the first commercially available 1 GIPS sequential processor (7 Sep 1994). Compare KIPS.

["A 1-GIPS Josephson Data Processor", Yuji Hatano et al, IEEE J Solid State Circuits, vol 26, 6, June 1991]

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1994-11-02

Nearby terms:

GIM-1GINGINAGingerGIPGIPSGIRLGISGiuseppe PeanoGIYFGKS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIRL

Graph Information Retrieval Language. A language for handling directed graphs.

["Graph Information Retrieval Language", S. Berkowitz, Report 76-0085, Naval Ship Res Dev Center, (Feb 1976)].

Last updated: 1994-11-02

Nearby terms:

GINAGingerGIPGIPSGIRLGISGiuseppe PeanoGIYFGKSGKS-3D

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIS

Geographical Information System

Nearby terms:

GingerGIPGIPSGIRLGISGiuseppe PeanoGIYFGKSGKS-3DGL

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Giuseppe Peano

<person, mathematics, logic>

(1858-08-27 - 1932-04-20) An Italian mathematician who wrote over 200 books and papers, was a founder of mathematical logic and set theory and taught at the University of Turin. He contributed to mathematical analysis, logic, the teaching of calculus, differential equations, vector analysis and the axiomatization of mathematics. The standard axiomatization of the natural numbers is named Peano arithmetic or the Peano axioms after him. He also invented the Peano curve, an early example of a fractal.

Last updated: 2013-03-23

Nearby terms:

GingerGIPGIPSGIRLGISGiuseppe PeanoGIYFGKSGKS-3DGLgl

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GIYF

<chat, web>

Google Is Your Friend. See STFW.

Last updated: 2014-05-23

Nearby terms:

GIPSGIRLGISGiuseppe PeanoGIYFGKSGKS-3DGLglGlammar

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GKS

Graphical Kernel System

Nearby terms:

GIRLGISGiuseppe PeanoGIYFGKSGKS-3DGLglGlammarglark

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GKS-3D

The three-dimensional version of GKS, a standard for graphics I/O (ISO 8805).

Last updated: 1994-11-02

Nearby terms:

GISGiuseppe PeanoGIYFGKSGKS-3DGLglGlammarglarkGlasgow Haskell Compiler

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GL

Graphics Language. A graphics package from Silicon Graphics.

Nearby terms:

GIYFGKSGKS-3DGLglGlammarglarkGlasgow Haskell Compiler

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gl

<networking>

The country code for Greenland.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

GKSGKS-3DGLglGlammarglarkGlasgow Haskell CompilerGLASS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Glammar

A pattern transformation language for text-to-text translation. Used for compiler writing and linguistics.

ftp://phoibos.cs.kun.nl/pub/GLASS/glammar.tar.Z.

Nearby terms:

GKS-3DGLglGlammarglarkGlasgow Haskell CompilerGLASS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glark

/glark/ To figure something out from context. "The System III manuals are pretty poor, but you can generally glark the meaning from context." Interestingly, the word was originally "glork"; the context was "This gubblick contains many nonsklarkish English flutzpahs, but the overall pluggandisp can be glorked [sic] from context" (David Moser, quoted by Douglas Hofstadter in his "Metamagical Themas" column in the January 1981 "Scientific American"). It is conjectured that hackish usage mutated the verb to "glark" because glork was already an established jargon term.

Compare grok, zen.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

GLglGlammarglarkGlasgow Haskell CompilerGLASSglassglass box testing

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Glasgow Haskell Compiler

<language>

(GHC) A Haskell 1.2 compiler written in Haskell by the AQUA project at Glasgow University, headed by Simon Peyton Jones <simonpj@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk> throughout the 1990's [started?]. GHC can generate either C or native code for SPARC, DEC Alpha and other platforms. It can take advantage of features of gcc such as global register variables and has an extensive set of optimisations.

GHC features an extensible I/O system based on a "monad", in-line C code, fully fledged unboxed data types, incrementally-updatable arrays, mutable reference types, generational garbage collector, concurrent threads. Time and space profiling is also supported.

It requires GNU gcc 2.1+ and Perl.

GHC runs on Sun-4, DEC Alpha, Sun-3, NeXT, DECstation, HP-PA and SGI.

Latest version: 4.01, as of 1998-11-30.

Glasgow FTP. Yale. Sweden.

Papers.

["Imperative functional programming", Peyton Jones & Wadler, POPL '93].

["Unboxed data types as first-class citizens", Peyton Jones & Launchbury, FPCA '91].

["Profiling lazy functional languages", Sansom & Peyton Jones, Glasgow workshop '92].

["Implementing lazy functional languages on stock hardware", Peyton Jones, Journal of Functional Programming, Apr 1992].

E-mail: <glasgow-haskell-request@dcs.glasgow.ac.uk>.

Last updated: 1999-01-05

Nearby terms:

GlammarglarkGlasgow Haskell CompilerGLASSglassglass box testing

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GLASS

General LAnguage for System Semantics.

An Esprit project at the University of Nijmegen.

ftp://phoibos.cs.kun.nl/pub/GLASS.

Last updated: 1995-01-25

Nearby terms:

glarkGlasgow Haskell CompilerGLASSglassglass box testing

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glass

(IBM) silicon.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

Glasgow Haskell CompilerGLASSglassglass box testingglassfet

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glass box testing

white box testing

Nearby terms:

Glasgow Haskell CompilerGLASSglassglass box testingglassfetglass ttyGLB

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glassfet

/glas'fet/ [Analogy with MOSFET] (or "firebottle") A humorous way to refer to a vacuum tube.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

GLASSglassglass box testingglassfetglass ttyGLBglibcGlish

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glass tty

/glas T-T-Y/ or /glas ti'tee/ A terminal that has a display screen but which, because of hardware or software limitations, behaves like a teletype or some other printing terminal, thereby combining the disadvantages of both: like a printing terminal, it can't do fancy display hacks, and like a display terminal, it doesn't produce hard copy. An example is the early "dumb" version of Lear-Siegler ADM 3 (without cursor control). See tube, tty; compare dumb terminal, smart terminal. See "TV Typewriters" for an interesting true story about a glass tty.

Nearby terms:

glassglass box testingglassfetglass ttyGLBglibcGlishGlisp

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GLB

greatest lower bound

Nearby terms:

glass box testingglassfetglass ttyGLBglibcGlishGlispglitch

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glibc

GNU C Library

Nearby terms:

glass box testingglassfetglass ttyGLBglibcGlishGlispglitchglob

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Glish

Glish is an interpretive language for building loosely-coupled distributed systems from modular, event-oriented programs. Written by Vern Paxson <vern@ee.lbl.gov>. These programs are written in conventional languages such as C, C++, or Fortran.

Glish scripts can create local and remote processes and control their communication. Glish also provides a full, array-oriented programming language (similar to S) for manipulating binary data sent between the processes. In general Glish uses a centralised communication model where interprocess communication passes through the Glish interpreter, allowing dynamic modification and rerouting of data values, but Glish also supports point-to-point links between processes when necessary for high performance.

Version 2.4.1 includes an interpreter, C++ class library and user manual. It requires C++ and there are ports to SunOS, Ultrix, an HP/UX (rusty).

ftp://ftp.ee.lbl.gov/glish/glish-2.4.1.tar.Z.

["Glish: A User-Level Software Bus for Loosely-Coupled Distributed Systems," Vern Paxson and Chris Saltmarsh, Proceedings of the 1993 Winter USENIX Conference, San Diego, CA, January, 1993].

Last updated: 1993-11-01

Nearby terms:

glassfetglass ttyGLBglibcGlishGlispglitchglobglobal index

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Glisp

Generalized LISP. D.C. Smith, Aug 1990. A coordinated set of high-level syntaxes for Common LISP. Contains Mlisp, Plisp and ordinary LISP, with an extensible framework for adding others. Written in Plisp.

ftp://bric-a-brac.apple.com/dts/mac/lisp.

Nearby terms:

GLBglibcGlishGlispglitchglobglobal indexglobalisation

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glitch

/glich/ [German "glitschen" to slip, via Yiddish "glitshen", to slide or skid] 1. (Electronics) When the inputs of a circuit change, and the outputs change to some random value for some very brief time before they settle down to the correct value. If another circuit inspects the output at just the wrong time, reading the random value, the results can be very wrong and very hard to debug (a glitch is one of many causes of electronic heisenbugs).

2. A sudden interruption in electric service, sanity, continuity, or program function. Sometimes recoverable. An interruption in electric service is specifically called a "power glitch" (or power hit), of grave concern because it usually crashes all the computers. See also gritch.

2. [Stanford] To scroll a display screen, especially several lines at a time. WAITS terminals used to do this in order to avoid continuous scrolling, which is distracting to the eye.

4. Obsolete. Same as magic cookie.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

glibcGlishGlispglitchglobglobal indexglobalisationGlobal Network Navigator

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glob

<file system, programming>

/glob/ A mechanism that returns a list of pathnames that match a pattern containing wild card characters. Globbing was available in early versions of Unix and, in more limited form, in Microsoft Windows.

The characters are:

* = zero or more characters, e.g. "probab*" would match probabilistic, probabilistically, probabilities, probability, probable, probably.

? = any single character, e.g. "b?g" would match bag, big, bog, bug.

[] any of the enclosed characters, e.g. "b[ao]g" would match bag, bog (not on Windows).

These have become sufficiently pervasive that hackers use them in written messages. E.g. "He said his name was [KC]arl" (expresses ambiguity). "I don't read talk.politics.*" (any of the talk.politics subgroups on Usenet). Other examples are given under the entry for X.

Later Unix shells introduced the x,y,z syntax which expands to a comma-separated list of alternatives, thus foobaz,qux would expand to "foobaz" and "fooqux". This differs from a glob because it generates a list of all possible expansions, rather than matching against existing files.

Glob patterns are similar, but not identical, to regular expressions.

"glob" was a subprogram that expanded wild cards in archaic pre-Bourne versions of the Unix shell. It is also a bulit-in function in Perl.

Last updated: 2014-08-22

Nearby terms:

Glispglitchglobglobal indexglobalisationGlobal Network Navigator

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

global index

<filename extension>

(gid) The filename extension of a Windows 95 "global index" file. .gid files are created by the help browser internal to Windows 95 (also available for other Windows versions) for WinHelp files (hlp), as well as for storing user preferences, such as window position.

Last updated: 1997-01-30

Nearby terms:

glitchglobglobal indexglobalisationGlobal Network Navigator

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

globalisation

internationalisation

Nearby terms:

global indexglobalisationGlobal Network NavigatorGlobal Positioning System

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Global Network Navigator

(GNN) A collection of free services provided by O'Reilly & Associates.

The Whole Internet Catalog describes the most useful Net resources and services with live links to those resources. The GNN Business Pages list companies on the Internet. The Internet Help Desk provides help in starting Internetq exploration. NetNews is a weekly publication that reports on the news of the Internet, with weekly articles on Internet trends and special events, sports, weather, and comics. There are also pages aobut travel and personal finance.

Home page.

E-mail: <support@gnn.com>.

Telephone: (800) 998 9938 (USA), +1 (707) 829 0515 (outside USA).

Last updated: 1995-01-10

Nearby terms:

globalisationGlobal Network NavigatorGlobal Positioning System

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Global Positioning System

<communications>

(GPS) A system for determining postion on the Earth's surface by comparing radio signals from several satellites. When completed the system will consist of 24 satellites equipped with radio transmitters and atomic clocks.

Depending on your geographic location, the GPS receiver samples data from up to six satellites, it then calculates the time taken for each satellite signal to reach the GPS receiver, and from the difference in time of reception, determines your location.

["Global Positioning by Satellite"? Precison? Coverage? Web page?]

Last updated: 1998-02-10

Nearby terms:

Global Positioning SystemGlobal System for Mobile Communications

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Global System for Mobile Communications

<communications>

(GSM, originally "Groupe de travail Sp?ciale pour les services Mobiles") One of the major standards for digital cellular communications, in use in over 60 countries and serving over one billion subscribers. The GSM standard is currently used in the 900 MHz, 1800 MHz and 1900 MHz bands.

GPRS allows circuit switched data communications over GSM, and is widely used for World Wide Web and electronic mail access from cellular devices.

GSM World.

Last updated: 2005-01-26

Nearby terms:

Global Positioning SystemGlobal System for Mobile Communicationsglork

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glork

/glork/ 1. Used as a name for just about anything.

See foo.

2. Similar to glitch, but usually used reflexively. "My program just glorked itself."

See also glark.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

Global Positioning SystemGlobal System for Mobile CommunicationsglorkGLOSGLOW

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GLOS

Graphics Language Object System.

Nearby terms:

Global System for Mobile CommunicationsglorkGLOSGLOWGLS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GLOW

<language>

A POP-11 variant with lexical scope.

Available from Andrew Arnblaster, Bollostraat 6, B-3140 Keerbergen, Belgium, for Mac or MS-DOS.

[Byte's UK edition, May 1992, p.84UK-8].

Last updated: 1997-02-07

Nearby terms:

Global System for Mobile CommunicationsglorkGLOSGLOWGLSGLUglue

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GLS

Guy Lewis Steele, Jr.

Nearby terms:

Global System for Mobile CommunicationsglorkGLOSGLOWGLSGLUglueglue languageglyph

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GLU

<language>

A practical coarse grain implementation of the Lucid dataflow language for networks.

Last updated: 1998-03-07

Nearby terms:

glorkGLOSGLOWGLSGLUglueglue languageglyphGlypnirgm

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glue

<jargon>

A generic term for any interface logic or protocol that connects two component blocks. For example, Blue Glue is IBM's SNA protocol, and hardware designers call anything used to connect large VLSI's or circuit blocks "glue logic".

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1999-02-22

Nearby terms:

GLOSGLOWGLSGLUglueglue languageglyphGlypnirgmGMAP

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glue language

<language>

Any language, usually a scripting language, used to write glue to integrate tools and other programs to solve some problem.

Last updated: 1999-02-22

Nearby terms:

GLOSGLOWGLSGLUglueglue languageglyphGlypnirgmGMAPGMD

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

glyph

<character>

An image used in the visual representation of characters; roughly speaking, how a character looks. A font is a set of glyphs.

In the simple case, for a given font (typeface and size), each character corresponds to a single glyph but this is not always the case, especially in a language with a large alphabet where one character may correspond to several glyphs or several characters to one glyph (a character encoding).

Usually used in reference to outline fonts, in particular TrueType.

Last updated: 1998-05-31

Nearby terms:

GLSGLUglueglue languageglyphGlypnirgmGMAPGMDGMD Toolbox for Compiler Construction

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Glypnir

1966. An ALGOL-like language with parallel extensions. Similar to Actus. "GLYPNIR - A Programming Language for the Illiac IV", D.H. Lawrie et al, CACM 18(3) (Mar 1975).

Nearby terms:

glueglue languageglyphGlypnirgmGMAPGMDGMD Toolbox for Compiler Construction

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gm

<networking>

The country code for Gambia.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

glyphGlypnirgmGMAPGMDGMD Toolbox for Compiler Construction

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GMAP

GCOS Macro Assembler Program

Nearby terms:

GlypnirgmGMAPGMDGMD Toolbox for Compiler ConstructionGMT

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GMD

<company>

Full name: "GMD - Forschungszentrum Informationstechnik GmbH" (German National Research Center for Information Technology).

Before April 1995, GMD stood for "Gesellschaft für Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung" - National Research Center for Computer Science, it is retained for historical reasons.

http://gmd.de/GMDHome.english.html.

Address: D-53754 Sankt Augustin, Germany.

Last updated: 1995-04-10

Nearby terms:

GlypnirgmGMAPGMDGMD Toolbox for Compiler ConstructionGMTgn

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GMD Toolbox for Compiler Construction

(Or Cocktail) A huge set of compiler building tools for MS-DOS, Unix and OS/2.

parser generator (LALR -> C, Modula-2), documentation, parser generator (LL(1) -> C, Modula-2), tests, scanner generator (-> C, Modula-2), tests translator (Extended BNF -> BNF), translator (Modula-2 -> C), translator (BNF (yacc) -> Extended BNF), examples abstract syntax tree generator, attribute-evaluator generator, code generator

Latest version: 9209.

The MS-DOS version requires DJ Delorie's DOS extender (go32) and the OS/2 version requires the emx programming environment.

ftp://ftp.karlsruhe.gmd.de/pub/cocktail/dos. OS/2 FTP.

Mailing list: listserv@eb.ele.tue.nl (subscribe to Cocktail). E-mail: Josef Grosch <grosch@karlsruhe.gmd.de>, Willem Jan Withagen <wjw@eb.ele.tue.nl> (OS/2).

Last updated: 1992-01-01

Nearby terms:

GMAPGMDGMD Toolbox for Compiler ConstructionGMTgngnarly

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GMT

Universal Time 1

Nearby terms:

GMDGMD Toolbox for Compiler ConstructionGMTgngnarlyGnat

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gn

<networking>

The country code for Guinea.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

GMD Toolbox for Compiler ConstructionGMTgngnarlyGnatGNATS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gnarly

<jargon>

/nar'lee/ Both obscure and hairy. "Yow! - the tuned assembler implementation of BitBlt is really gnarly!" From a similar but less specific usage in surfer slang.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1996-09-17

Nearby terms:

GMD Toolbox for Compiler ConstructionGMTgngnarlyGnatGNATSGNN

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gnat

<language, tool>

An Ada compiler written in Ada using the gcc code generator to allow easy porting to a variety of platforms. Gnat is the only Ada compiler that completely implements the Ada standard, including all the annexes.

The compiler is released under the GNU license and is currently maintained by Ada Core Technologies (ACT).

http://gnat.com/.

Last updated: 1999-06-24

Nearby terms:

GMD Toolbox for Compiler ConstructionGMTgngnarlyGnatGNATSGNNGNOMEGnome Computers

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNATS

GNU Problem Report Management System

Nearby terms:

GMTgngnarlyGnatGNATSGNNGNOMEGnome ComputersGNUGNU archive site

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNN

Global Network Navigator

Nearby terms:

gnarlyGnatGNATSGNNGNOMEGnome ComputersGNUGNU archive site

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNOME

GNU Network Object Model Environment

Nearby terms:

GnatGNATSGNNGNOMEGnome ComputersGNUGNU archive siteGNU assembler

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gnome Computers

<company>

A small UK hardware and software company. They make transputer boards for the Acorn Archimedes among other things.

E-mail: Chris Stenton <chris@gnome.co.uk>.

Last updated: 1994-09-30

Nearby terms:

GNNGNOMEGnome ComputersGNUGNU archive siteGNU assembler

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU

<body, project>

/g*noo/ 1. A recursive acronym: "GNU's Not Unix!". The Free Software Foundation's project to provide a freely distributable replacement for Unix. The GNU Manifesto was published in the March 1985 issue of Dr. Dobb's Journal but the GNU project started a year and a half earlier when Richard Stallman was trying to get funding to work on his freely distributable editor, Emacs.

Emacs and the GNU C compiler, gcc, two tools designed for this project, have become very popular. GNU software is available from many GNU archive sites.

See also Hurd.

<person>

2. John Gilmore.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1997-04-12

Nearby terms:

GNOMEGnome ComputersGNUGNU archive siteGNU assemblerGNU awk

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU archive site

<body>

The main GNU FTP archive is on gnu.org but copies ("mirrors") of some or all of the files there are also held on many other computers around the world. To avoid overloading gnu.org and the Internet you should FTP files from the machine closest to yours (you may be able to use traceroute to determine which is logically closest if it's not obvious from the transfer rate). Trans-ocean TCP/IP links are very expensive and usually very slow.

The following hosts mirror GNU files. Look for a directory like /pub/gnu, /mirrors/gnu, /systems/gnu or /archives/gnu. Electronic mail addresses of administrators and Internet addresses are given for some hosts.

Original list.

Australia: archie.au, archie.oz, archie.oz.au

Brazil: ccsun.unicamp.br (143.106.1.5, <root@ccsun.unicamp.br>)

Denmark: ftp.denet.dk

Europe: archive.eu.net (192.16.202.1)

Finland: ftp.funet.fi (128.214.6.100, gnu-adm)

France: irisa.irisa.fr, ftp.univ-lyon1.fr (<ftpmaint@ftp.univ-lyon1.fr>)

Germany, ftp://ftp.informatik.rwth-aachen.de/, ftp://ftp.germany.eu.net/).

Israel: ftp.technion.ac.il (<ftp-admin@ftp.technion.ac.il>)

Japan: utsun.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp, ftp.cs.titech.ac.jp

Korea: cair.kaist.ac.kr (143.248.11.170)

Netherlands: hp4nl.nluug.nl, ftp.win.tue.nl (131.155.70.100)

Norway: ugle.unit.no (129.241.1.97)

South Africa: ftp.sun.ac.za

Sweden: isy.liu.se, ftp.stacken.kth.se, ftp.luth.se, ftp.sunet.se, <archive@ftp.sunet.se>, sdi.slu.se.

Switzerland: ftp.eunet.ch, nic.switch.ch

Thailand: ftp.nectec.or.th (192.150.251.32, <ftp@nwg.nectec.or.th>)

UK: src.doc.ic.ac.uk (146.169.3.7, <info-server@doc.ic.ac.uk>, <lmjm@doc.ic.ac.uk> also sun cartridge or exabyte tapes); info-server@cs.nott.ac.uk (<jpo@cs.nott.ac.uk>); I.G.Batten@fulcrum.bt.co.uk (also qic-21 and qic-24 tapes); ftp.mcc.ac.uk (130.88.203.12); Unix.hensa.ac.uk; ftp.warwick.ac.uk (137.205.192.14, <Unixhelp@warwick.ac.uk>).

USA: louie.udel.edu, ftp.kpc.com (Silicon Valley, CA) ftp.hawaii.edu, f.ms.uky.edu, ftp.digex.net (Internet address 164.109.10.23, run by <mcguire@digex.net>), wuarchive.wustl.edu, col.hp.com, ftp.cs.columbia.edu, vixen.cso.uiuc.edu, mrcnext.cso.uiuc.edu, jaguar.utah.edu, gatekeeper.dec.com, labrea.stanford.edu, ftp.cs.widener.edu, archive.cis.ohio-state.edu, and ftp.uu.net.

Western Canada: ftp.cs.ubc.ca (<ftp-admin@cs.ubc.ca>)

Last updated: 1999-12-09

Nearby terms:

Gnome ComputersGNUGNU archive siteGNU assemblerGNU awkGNU BC

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU assembler

(GAS) A Unix assembler for the GNU project. Many CPU types are handled and COFF and IEEE-695 formats are supported as well as standard a.out.

Current version 2.2 ported to Sun-3, Sun-4, i386, 386BSD, BSD/386, Linux, PS/2-AIX, VAX, Ultrix, BSD, VMS.

The assembler has been merged with GNU Binutils.

E-mail: <bug-gnu-utils@gnu.org>.

Last updated: 1995-04-18

Nearby terms:

Gnome ComputersGNUGNU archive siteGNU assemblerGNU awkGNU BCGNU C

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU awk

gawk

Nearby terms:

GNU archive siteGNU assemblerGNU awkGNU BCGNU CGNU C Library

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU BC

A GNU version of BC which is self-contained and internally executes its own compiled code rather than acting as a front-end to DC like the standard Unix bc.

Version 1.02

parser (yacc), interpreter, BC math library

Philip A. Nelson <phil@cs.wwu.edu>

FTP bc-1.02.tar.Z from a GNU archive site.

requires: vsprintf and vfprintf routines

ports: Unix (BSD, System V, MINIX, POSIX) Superset of POSIX BC (P10003.2/D11), with a POSIX-only mode.

Nearby terms:

GNU archive siteGNU assemblerGNU awkGNU BCGNU CGNU C LibraryGNU DC

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU C

<language>

The extension of C compiled by gcc.

Last updated: 1997-09-30

Nearby terms:

GNU assemblerGNU awkGNU BCGNU CGNU C LibraryGNU DCGNU E

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU C Library

<library>

(glibc) The run-time library for the GNU C compiler, gcc, and others. glibc is the source code for libc.a. It is maintained separately from the compilers and is a superset of ANSI C and POSIX.1 and a large subset of POSIX.2.

Latest version: 2.1.3, as of 2000-04-29

http://gnu.org/glibc.

Mailing list: <bug-glibc@gnu.org> (bugs).

Last updated: 2000-05-31

Nearby terms:

GNU awkGNU BCGNU CGNU C LibraryGNU DCGNU EGNU EmacsGNU Free Documentation License

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU DC

GNU Desktop Calculator.

An interpreter for a subset of the standard Unix DC that handles all its operations, except the (undocumented) array operations. Integration with GNU BC is being attempted.

Version 0.2.

FTP dc-0.2.tar.Z from your nearest GNU archive site.

Last updated: 1993-05-21

Nearby terms:

GNU CGNU C LibraryGNU DCGNU EGNU EmacsGNU Free Documentation License

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU E

A persistent C++ variant

Version 2.3.3

compiler

ftp://ftp.cs.wisc.edu/exodus/E/.

GNU E is a persistent, object oriented programming language developed as part of the Exodus project. GNU E extends C++ with the notion of persistent data, program level data objects that can be transparently used across multiple executions of a program, or multiple programs, without explicit input and output operations.

GNU E's form of persistence is based on extensions to the C++ type system to distinguish potentially persistent data objects from objects that are always memory resident. An object is made persistent either by its declaration (via a new "persistent" storage class qualifier) or by its method of allocation (via persistent dynamic allocation using a special overloading of the new operator). The underlying object storage system is the Exodus storage manager, which provides concurrency control and recovery in addition to storage for persistent data.

restriction: Copyleft; not all run-time sources are available (yet)

requires: release 2.1.1 of the Exodus storage manager

E-mail: <exodus@cs.wisc.edu>.

Last updated: 1993-01-20

Nearby terms:

GNU C LibraryGNU DCGNU EGNU EmacsGNU Free Documentation License

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU Emacs

Emacs

Nearby terms:

GNU EGNU EmacsGNU Free Documentation LicenseGNU General Public License

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU Free Documentation License

<legal>

(GFDL) The Free Software Foundation's license designed to ensure the same freedoms for documentation that the GPL gives to software.

This dictionary is distributed under the GFDL, see the copyright notice in the Free On-line Dictionary of Computing section (at the start of the source file). The full text follows.

Version 1.1, March 2000

Copyright 2000 Free Software Foundation, Inc.

59 Temple Place, Suite 330, Boston, MA 02111-1307 USA

Everyone is permitted to copy and distribute verbatim copies of this license document, but changing it is not allowed.

0. PREAMBLE

The purpose of this License is to make a manual, textbook, or other written document "free" in the sense of freedom: to assure everyone the effective freedom to copy and redistribute it, with or without modifying it, either commercially or noncommercially. Secondarily, this License preserves for the author and publisher a way to get credit for their work, while not being considered responsible for modifications made by others.

This License is a kind of "copyleft", which means that derivative works of the document must themselves be free in the same sense. It complements the GNU General Public License, which is a copyleft license designed for free software.

We have designed this License in order to use it for manuals for free software, because free software needs free documentation: a free program should come with manuals providing the same freedoms that the software does. But this License is not limited to software manuals; it can be used for any textual work, regardless of subject matter or whether it is published as a printed book. We recommend this License principally for works whose purpose is instruction or reference.

1. APPLICABILITY AND DEFINITIONS

This License applies to any manual or other work that contains a notice placed by the copyright holder saying it can be distributed under the terms of this License. The "Document", below, refers to any such manual or work. Any member of the public is a licensee, and is addressed as "you".

A "Modified Version" of the Document means any work containing the Document or a portion of it, either copied verbatim, or with modifications and/or translated into another language.

A "Secondary Section" is a named appendix or a front-matter section of the Document that deals exclusively with the relationship of the publishers or authors of the Document to the Document's overall subject (or to related matters) and contains nothing that could fall directly within that overall subject. (For example, if the Document is in part a textbook of mathematics, a Secondary Section may not explain any mathematics.) The relationship could be a matter of historical connection with the subject or with related matters, or of legal, commercial, philosophical, ethical or political position regarding them.

The "Invariant Sections" are certain Secondary Sections whose titles are designated, as being those of Invariant Sections, in the notice that says that the Document is released under this License.

The "Cover Texts" are certain short passages of text that are listed, as Front-Cover Texts or Back-Cover Texts, in the notice that says that the Document is released under this License.

A "Transparent" copy of the Document means a machine-readable copy, represented in a format whose specification is available to the general public, whose contents can be viewed and edited directly and straightforwardly with generic text editors or (for images composed of pixels) generic paint programs or (for drawings) some widely available drawing editor, and that is suitable for input to text formatters or for automatic translation to a variety of formats suitable for input to text formatters. A copy made in an otherwise Transparent file format whose markup has been designed to thwart or discourage subsequent modification by readers is not Transparent. A copy that is not "Transparent" is called "Opaque".

Examples of suitable formats for Transparent copies include plain ASCII without markup, Texinfo input format, LaTeX input format, SGML or XML using a publicly available DTD, and standard-conforming simple HTML designed for human modification. Opaque formats include PostScript, PDF, proprietary formats that can be read and edited only by proprietary word processors, SGML or XML for which the DTD and/or processing tools are not generally available, and the machine-generated HTML produced by some word processors for output purposes only.

The "Title Page" means, for a printed book, the title page itself, plus such following pages as are needed to hold, legibly, the material this License requires to appear in the title page. For works in formats which do not have any title page as such, "Title Page" means the text near the most prominent appearance of the work's title, preceding the beginning of the body of the text.

2. VERBATIM COPYING

You may copy and distribute the Document in any medium, either commercially or noncommercially, provided that this License, the copyright notices, and the license notice saying this License applies to the Document are reproduced in all copies, and that you add no other conditions whatsoever to those of this License. You may not use technical measures to obstruct or control the reading or further copying of the copies you make or distribute. However, you may accept compensation in exchange for copies. If you distribute a large enough number of copies you must also follow the conditions in section 3.

You may also lend copies, under the same conditions stated above, and you may publicly display copies.

3. COPYING IN QUANTITY

If you publish printed copies of the Document numbering more than 100, and the Document's license notice requires Cover Texts, you must enclose the copies in covers that carry, clearly and legibly, all these Cover Texts: Front-Cover Texts on the front cover, and Back-Cover Texts on the back cover. Both covers must also clearly and legibly identify you as the publisher of these copies. The front cover must present the full title with all words of the title equally prominent and visible. You may add other material on the covers in addition. Copying with changes limited to the covers, as long as they preserve the title of the Document and satisfy these conditions, can be treated as verbatim copying in other respects.

If the required texts for either cover are too voluminous to fit legibly, you should put the first ones listed (as many as fit reasonably) on the actual cover, and continue the rest onto adjacent pages.

If you publish or distribute Opaque copies of the Document numbering more than 100, you must either include a machine-readable Transparent copy along with each Opaque copy, or state in or with each Opaque copy a publicly-accessible computer-network location containing a complete Transparent copy of the Document, free of added material, which the general network-using public has access to download anonymously at no charge using public-standard network protocols. If you use the latter option, you must take reasonably prudent steps, when you begin distribution of Opaque copies in quantity, to ensure that this Transparent copy will remain thus accessible at the stated location until at least one year after the last time you distribute an Opaque copy (directly or through your agents or retailers) of that edition to the public.

It is requested, but not required, that you contact the authors of the Document well before redistributing any large number of copies, to give them a chance to provide you with an updated version of the Document.

4. MODIFICATIONS

You may copy and distribute a Modified Version of the Document under the conditions of sections 2 and 3 above, provided that you release the Modified Version under precisely this License, with the Modified Version filling the role of the Document, thus licensing distribution and modification of the Modified Version to whoever possesses a copy of it. In addition, you must do these things in the Modified Version:

A. Use in the Title Page (and on the covers, if any) a title distinct from that of the Document, and from those of previous versions (which should, if there were any, be listed in the History section of the Document). You may use the same title as a previous version if the original publisher of that version gives permission.

B. List on the Title Page, as authors, one or more persons or entities responsible for authorship of the modifications in the Modified Version, together with at least five of the principal authors of the Document (all of its principal authors, if it has less than five).

C. State on the Title page the name of the publisher of the Modified Version, as the publisher.

D. Preserve all the copyright notices of the Document.

E. Add an appropriate copyright notice for your modifications adjacent to the other copyright notices.

F. Include, immediately after the copyright notices, a license notice giving the public permission to use the Modified Version under the terms of this License, in the form shown in the Addendum below.

G. Preserve in that license notice the full lists of Invariant Sections and required Cover Texts given in the Document's license notice.

H. Include an unaltered copy of this License.

I. Preserve the section entitled "History", and its title, and add to it an item stating at least the title, year, new authors, and publisher of the Modified Version as given on the Title Page. If there is no section entitled "History" in the Document, create one stating the title, year, authors, and publisher of the Document as given on its Title Page, then add an item describing the Modified Version as stated in the previous sentence.

J. Preserve the network location, if any, given in the Document for public access to a Transparent copy of the Document, and likewise the network locations given in the Document for previous versions it was based on. These may be placed in the "History" section. You may omit a network location for a work that was published at least four years before the Document itself, or if the original publisher of the version it refers to gives permission.

K. In any section entitled "Acknowledgements" or "Dedications", preserve the section's title, and preserve in the section all the substance and tone of each of the contributor acknowledgements and/or dedications given therein.

L. Preserve all the Invariant Sections of the Document, unaltered in their text and in their titles. Section numbers or the equivalent are not considered part of the section titles.

M. Delete any section entitled "Endorsements". Such a section may not be included in the Modified Version.

N. Do not retitle any existing section as "Endorsements" or to conflict in title with any Invariant Section. If the Modified Version includes new front-matter sections or appendices that qualify as Secondary Sections and contain no material copied from the Document, you may at your option designate some or all of these sections as invariant. To do this, add their titles to the list of Invariant Sections in the Modified Version's license notice. These titles must be distinct from any other section titles.

You may add a section entitled "Endorsements", provided it contains nothing but endorsements of your Modified Version by various parties--for example, statements of peer review or that the text has been approved by an organization as the authoritative definition of a standard.

You may add a passage of up to five words as a Front-Cover Text, and a passage of up to 25 words as a Back-Cover Text, to the end of the list of Cover Texts in the Modified Version. Only one passage of Front-Cover Text and one of Back-Cover Text may be added by (or through arrangements made by) any one entity. If the Document already includes a cover text for the same cover, previously added by you or by arrangement made by the same entity you are acting on behalf of, you may not add another; but you may replace the old one, on explicit permission from the previous publisher that added the old one.

The author(s) and publisher(s) of the Document do not by this License give permission to use their names for publicity for or to assert or imply endorsement of any Modified Version.

5. COMBINING DOCUMENTS

You may combine the Document with other documents released under this License, under the terms defined in section 4 above for modified versions, provided that you include in the combination all of the Invariant Sections of all of the original documents, unmodified, and list them all as Invariant Sections of your combined work in its license notice.

The combined work need only contain one copy of this License, and multiple identical Invariant Sections may be replaced with a single copy. If there are multiple Invariant Sections with the same name but different contents, make the title of each such section unique by adding at the end of it, in parentheses, the name of the original author or publisher of that section if known, or else a unique number. Make the same adjustment to the section titles in the list of Invariant Sections in the license notice of the combined work.

In the combination, you must combine any sections entitled "History" in the various original documents, forming one section entitled "History"; likewise combine any sections entitled "Acknowledgements", and any sections entitled "Dedications". You must delete all sections entitled "Endorsements."

6. COLLECTIONS OF DOCUMENTS

You may make a collection consisting of the Document and other documents released under this License, and replace the individual copies of this License in the various documents with a single copy that is included in the collection, provided that you follow the rules of this License for verbatim copying of each of the documents in all other respects.

You may extract a single document from such a collection, and distribute it individually under this License, provided you insert a copy of this License into the extracted document, and follow this License in all other respects regarding verbatim copying of that document.

7. AGGREGATION WITH INDEPENDENT WORKS

A compilation of the Document or its derivatives with other separate and independent documents or works, in or on a volume of a storage or distribution medium, does not as a whole count as a Modified Version of the Document, provided no compilation copyright is claimed for the compilation. Such a compilation is called an "aggregate", and this License does not apply to the other self-contained works thus compiled with the Document, on account of their being thus compiled, if they are not themselves derivative works of the Document.

If the Cover Text requirement of section 3 is applicable to these copies of the Document, then if the Document is less than one quarter of the entire aggregate, the Document's Cover Texts may be placed on covers that surround only the Document within the aggregate. Otherwise they must appear on covers around the whole aggregate.

8. TRANSLATION

Translation is considered a kind of modification, so you may distribute translations of the Document under the terms of section 4. Replacing Invariant Sections with translations requires special permission from their copyright holders, but you may include translations of some or all Invariant Sections in addition to the original versions of these Invariant Sections. You may include a translation of this License provided that you also include the original English version of this License. In case of a disagreement between the translation and the original English version of this License, the original English version will prevail.

9. TERMINATION

You may not copy, modify, sublicense, or distribute the Document except as expressly provided for under this License. Any other attempt to copy, modify, sublicense or distribute the Document is void, and will automatically terminate your rights under this License. However, parties who have received copies, or rights, from you under this License will not have their licenses terminated so long as such parties remain in full compliance.

10. FUTURE REVISIONS OF THIS LICENSE

The Free Software Foundation may publish new, revised versions of the GNU Free Documentation License from time to time. Such new versions will be similar in spirit to the present version, but may differ in detail to address new problems or concerns. See here.

Each version of the License is given a distinguishing version number. If the Document specifies that a particular numbered version of this License "or any later version" applies to it, you have the option of following the terms and conditions either of that specified version or of any later version that has been published (not as a draft) by the Free Software Foundation. If the Document does not specify a version number of this License, you may choose any version ever published (not as a draft) by the Free Software Foundation.

End of full text of GFDL.

Last updated: 2002-03-09

Nearby terms:

GNU EmacsGNU Free Documentation LicenseGNU General Public License

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU General Public License

General Public License

Nearby terms:

GNU Free Documentation LicenseGNU General Public LicenseGNUMACS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNUMACS

/gnoo'maks/ [contraction of "GNU Emacs"] Often-heard abbreviated name for the GNU project's flagship tool, Emacs. Used especially in contrast with GOSMACS.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

GNU General Public LicenseGNUMACSGNU mirror siteGNU Network Object Model Environment

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU mirror site

GNU archive site

Nearby terms:

GNUMACSGNU mirror siteGNU Network Object Model Environment

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU Network Object Model Environment

<operating system>

(GNOME) A project to build a complete, user-friendly desktop based entirely on free software. GNOME is part of the GNU project and part of the OpenSource movement. The desktop will consist of small utilities and larger applications which share a consistent look and feel. GNOME uses GTK+ as the GUI toolkit for applications.

GNOME is intended to run on any modern and functional Unix-like system. The current version runs on Linux, FreeBSD, IRIX and Solaris.

http://gnome.org/.

Last updated: 1998-10-17

Nearby terms:

GNU mirror siteGNU Network Object Model EnvironmentGnuplot

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gnuplot

<tool>

A command-driven interactive graphing program. Gnuplot can plot two-dimensional functions and data points in many different styles (points, lines, error bars); and three-dimensional data points and surfaces in many different styles (contour plot, mesh). It supports complex arithmetic and user-defined functions and can label title, axes, and data points. It can output to several different graphics file formats and devices. Command line editing and history are supported and there is extensive on-line help.

Gnuplot is copyrighted, but freely distributable. It was written by Thomas Williams, Colin Kelley, Russell Lang, Dave Kotz, John Campbell, Gershon Elber, Alexander Woo and many others. Despite its name, gnuplot is not related to the GNU project or the FSF in any but the most peripheral sense. It was designed completely independently and is not covered by the General Public License. However, the FSF has decided to distribute gnuplot as part of the GNU system, because it is useful, redistributable software.

Gnuplot is available for: Unix (X11 and NEXTSTEP), VAX/VMS, OS/2, MS-DOS, Amiga, MS-Windows, OS-9/68k, Atari ST and Macintosh.

E-mail: <info-gnuplot@dartmouth.edu>.

FAQ - Germany, UK, USA.

Usenet newsgroup: comp.graphics.gnuplot.

Last updated: 1995-05-04

Nearby terms:

GNU Network Object Model EnvironmentGnuplotGNU Privacy Guard

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU Privacy Guard

<tool, cryptography} (GPG) GNU's encryption and digital signature tool intended to be a free replacement for PGP.

Last updated: 2003-04-12

Nearby terms:

GnuplotGNU Privacy GuardGNU Problem Report Management System

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU Problem Report Management System

<programming>

(GNATS) GNU's bug tracking system. Users who experience problems use electronic mail, web-based or other clients communicating with the GNATS network daemon running at the support site, or direct database submissions to communicate these problems to maintainers at that Support Site.

http://gnu.org/software/gnats.

Last updated: 2002-06-12

Nearby terms:

GNU Privacy GuardGNU Problem Report Management SystemGNU public licence

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU public licence

<legal>

Properly known as the General Public License. Improperly known as the General Public Virus.

Last updated: 1995-05-04

Nearby terms:

GNU Problem Report Management SystemGNU public licenceGNUS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNUS

<tool, networking>

GNU news.

A GNU Emacs subsystem for reading and sending Usenet news, written by Masanobu Umeda <umerin@mse.kyutech.ac.jp>. You can use GNUS to browse through news groups, look at summaries of articles in a specific group, and read articles of interest. You can respond to authors or write articles or replies to all the readers of a news group.

GNUS can be configured to use the NNTP protocol to get news from a remove server or it can read it from local news spool files.

Usenet newsgorup: gnu.emacs.gnus.

Last updated: 1995-05-04

Nearby terms:

GNU Problem Report Management SystemGNU public licenceGNUSGNU sedGNU Smalltalk

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU sed

<tool, text>

A GNU version of the standard Unix Sed stream editor. GNU sed was written by Tom Lord <lord+@andrew.cmu.edu>. Version 2.03.

FTP from your nearest GNU archive site.

E-mail: <bug-gnu-utils@gnu.org> (bugs).

Last updated: 1993-08-09

Nearby terms:

GNU public licenceGNUSGNU sedGNU SmalltalkGNUStepGNU style

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU Smalltalk

<language>

A GNU version of Smalltalk, by Steven Byrne <sbb@eng.sun.com>.

Version 1.1.1,

FTP from your nearest GNU archive site.

msgGUI is a graphical user interface library for GNU Smalltalk.

Last updated: 1991-09-15

Nearby terms:

GNUSGNU sedGNU SmalltalkGNUStepGNU styleGNU superoptimiser

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNUStep

<operating system>

A GNU implementation of OpenStep. Work has started on an implementation using an existing library written in Objective-C. Much work remains to be done to bring this library close to the OpenStep specifications. Adam Fedor is head of the project.

http://gnustep.org/.

[Current status? Newsgroup?]

Last updated: 1999-11-25

Nearby terms:

GNU sedGNU SmalltalkGNUStepGNU styleGNU superoptimiserGo

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU style

<programming>

An obsolete and deprecated source code indent style used throughout GNU Emacs and the Free Software Foundation code, and just about nowhere else. Indents are always four spaces per level, with "" and "" halfway between the outer and inner indent levels.

 if (cond)
  {
    <body>
  }

Last updated: 2014-09-24

Nearby terms:

GNU SmalltalkGNUStepGNU styleGNU superoptimiserGogoal

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GNU superoptimiser

(GSO) A function sequence generator that uses an exhaustive generate-and-test approach to find the shortest instruction sequence for a given function. Written by Torbjorn Granlund <tege@gnu.ai.mit.edu> and Tom Wood. You have to tell the superoptimiser which function and which CPU you want to get code for. This is useful for compiler writers.

FTP superopt-2.2.tar.Z from a GNU archive site.

Generates code for DEC Alpha, SPARC, Intel 80386, 88000, RS/6000, 68000, 29000 and Pyramid (SP, AP and XP).

Last updated: 1993-02-16

Nearby terms:

GNU SmalltalkGNUStepGNU styleGNU superoptimiserGogoalgoal seek

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Go

<games, application>

A thinking game with an oriental origin estimated to be around 4000 years old. Nowadays, the game is played by millions of people in (most notably) China, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. In the Western world the game is practised by a yearly increasing number of players. On the Internet Go players meet, play and talk 24 hours/day on the Internet Go Server (IGS).

http://cwi.nl/~jansteen/go/go.html.

Usenet newsgroup: rec.games.go.

Last updated: 1995-03-17

Nearby terms:

GNUStepGNU styleGNU superoptimiserGogoalgoal seekGo Back N

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

goal

<programming>

In logic programming, a predicate applied to its arguments which the system attempts to prove by matching it against the clauses of the program. A goal may fail or it may succeed in one or more ways.

Last updated: 1997-07-14

Nearby terms:

GNU styleGNU superoptimiserGogoalgoal seekGo Back Ngobble

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

goal seek

what-if analysis

Nearby terms:

GNU superoptimiserGogoalgoal seekGo Back NgobbleGObject Introspection

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Go Back N

<networking>

A data link layer protocol.

[Details?]

Last updated: 2010-01-19

Nearby terms:

goalgoal seekGo Back NgobbleGObject IntrospectionGodwin's Law

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gobble

<jargon>

1. To consume, usually used with "up". "The output spy gobbles characters out of a tty output buffer."

2. To obtain, usually used with "down". "I guess I'll gobble down a copy of the documentation tomorrow."

See also snarf.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 2010-01-19

Nearby terms:

goal seekGo Back NgobbleGObject IntrospectionGodwin's Law

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GObject Introspection

<programming>

A GNOME project that defines a syntax for introspection annotation pragmas to be used in the GObject library source code. Rather than actual introspection, these are intended to allow automatic generation of bindings (APIs) to expose the library to higher-level languages. The sort of information provided is the type and direction (in, out, inout) of function parameters and the responsibility for freeing memory used by data structures.

GObject Introspection Home.

Last updated: 2010-01-19

Nearby terms:

Go Back NgobbleGObject IntrospectionGodwin's LawGodzillagram

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Godwin's Law

<humour>

"As a Usenet discussion grows longer, the probability of a comparison involving Nazis or Hitler approaches one."

There is a tradition in many groups that, once this occurs, that thread is over, and whoever mentioned the Nazis has automatically lost whatever argument was in progress. Godwin's Law thus practically guarantees the existence of an upper bound on thread length in those groups. However there is also a widely recognised codicil that any intentional triggering of Godwin's Law in order to invoke its thread-ending effects will be unsuccessful.

[Jargon].

Last updated: 2003-10-06

Nearby terms:

gobbleGObject IntrospectionGodwin's LawGodzillagramGoedel

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Godzillagram

<networking>

/god-zil'*-gram/ (From Japan's national hero and datagram) 1. A network packet that in theory is a broadcast to every machine in the universe. The typical case is an IP datagram whose destination IP address is [255.255.255.255]. Fortunately, few gateways are foolish enough to attempt to implement this case!

2. A network packet of maximum size. An IP Godzillagram has 65,536 octets. Compare super source quench.

Last updated: 2003-10-07

Nearby terms:

GObject IntrospectionGodwin's LawGodzillagramGoedelgo-faster stripes

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Goedel

<language>

(After the mathematician Kurt Gödel) A declarative, general-purpose language for artificial intelligence based on logic programming. It can be regarded as a successor to Prolog. The type system is based on many-sorted logic with parametric polymorphism. Modularity is supported, as well as infinite precision arithmetic and finite sets.

Goedel has a rich collection of system modules and provides constraint solving in several domains. It also offers metalogical facilities that provide significant support for metaprograms that do analysis, transformation, compilation, verification, and debugging.

A significant subset of Goedel has been implemented on top of SISCtus Prolog by Jiwei Wang <jiwei@lapu.bristol.ac.uk>.

FTP Bristol, UK, FTP K U Leuven.

E-mail: <goedel@compsci.bristol.ac.uk>.

Last updated: 1995-05-02

Nearby terms:

Godwin's LawGodzillagramGoedelgo-faster stripesGoferGoffin

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

go-faster stripes

<jargon>

chrome. Mainstream in some parts of UK.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1998-07-05

Nearby terms:

GodzillagramGoedelgo-faster stripesGoferGoffingo flatline

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gofer

<language>

A lazy functional language designed by Mark Jones <mpj@cs.nott.ac.uk> at the Programming Research Group, Oxford, UK in 1991. It is very similar to Haskell 1.2. It has lazy evaluation, higher order functions, pattern matching, and type classes, lambda, case, conditional and let expressions, and wild card, "as" and irrefutable patterns. It lacks modules, arrays and standard classes.

Gofer comes with an interpreter (in C), a compiler which compiles to C, documentation and examples. Unix Version 2.30 (1994-06-10) Mac_Gofer version 0.16 beta. Ported to Sun, Acorn Archimedes, IBM PC, Macintosh, Atari, Amiga.

Version 2.30 added support for contexts in datatype and member function definitions, Haskell style arrays, an external function calling mechanism for gofc, an experimental implementation of Launchbury/Peyton Jones style lazy functional state threads, an experimental implementation of "do" notation for monad comprehensions.

Latest version: HUGS.

["Introduction to Gofer 2.20", M.P. Jones.]

[The implementation of the Gofer functional programming system, Mark P. Jones, Research Report YALEU/DCS/RR-1030, Yale University, Department of Computer Science, May 1994. FTP: nebula.cs.yale.edu/pub/yale-fp/reports].

http://cs.nott.ac.uk/Department/Staff/mpj/.

FTP Yale, FTP Glasgow, FTP Chalmers.

Last updated: 1995-02-14

Nearby terms:

GodzillagramGoedelgo-faster stripesGoferGoffingo flatlineGO-GO

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Goffin

<language>

A definitional constraint language for declarative parallel programming. Goffin systematically integrates equational constraints and functions within a uniform framework of concurrent programming.

Goffin is an embedding of a functional language kernel (Haskell) into a layer of constraint logic, which allows logical variables inside functional expressions. In order to preserve referential transparency, functional reduction suspends until logical variables become bound.

Logical variables are bound by equational constraints, which impose relations over expressions. Hence, constraints are the means to structure the concurrent reduction of functional expressions.

Last updated: 1995-02-21

Nearby terms:

Goedelgo-faster stripesGoferGoffingo flatlineGO-GOgo gold

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

go flatline

[Cyberpunk SF, refers to flattening of EEG traces upon brain-death] also "flatlined". 1. To die, terminate, or fail, especially irreversibly. In hacker parlance, this is used of machines only, human death being considered somewhat too serious a matter to employ jargon-jokes about.

2. To go completely quiescent; said of machines undergoing controlled shutdown. "You can suffer file damage if you shut down Unix but power off before the system has gone flatline."

3. Of a video tube, to fail by losing vertical scan, so all one sees is a bright horizontal line bisecting the screen.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

go-faster stripesGoferGoffingo flatlineGO-GOgo goldGOL

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GO-GO

ALPS

Nearby terms:

GoferGoffingo flatlineGO-GOgo goldGOLgoldengolf ball printer

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

go gold

<testing>

The point in the life of a software product where it is declared ready to release for sale. This may be because it has reached sufficiently high quality (freedom from bugs, etc.), or because it is financially expedient.

Last updated: 2004-08-02

Nearby terms:

Goffingo flatlineGO-GOgo goldGOLgoldengolf ball printer

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GOL

General Operating Language. Subsystem of DOCUS. [Sammet 1969, p.678].

Nearby terms:

go flatlineGO-GOgo goldGOLgoldengolf ball printerGOMgonk

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

golden

[Probabaly from folklore's "golden egg"] When used to describe a magnetic medium (e.g. "golden disk", "golden tape"), describes one containing a tested, up-to-spec, ready-to-ship software version. Compare platinum-iridium.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

GO-GOgo goldGOLgoldengolf ball printerGOMgonkgonkulator

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

golf ball printer

IBM 2741

Nearby terms:

go goldGOLgoldengolf ball printerGOMgonkgonkulatorGOOD

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GOM

Good Old MAD.

Don Boettner, U Mich. MAD for the IBM 360. Parts of the MTS time-sharing system were written in GOM.

Nearby terms:

GOLgoldengolf ball printerGOMgonkgonkulatorGOODGood Thing

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gonk

<jargon>

/gonk/ 1. To prevaricate or to embellish the truth beyond any reasonable recognition. In German the term is (mythically) "gonken"; in Spanish the verb becomes "gonkar". "You're gonking me. That story you just told me is a bunch of gonk." In German, for example, "Du gonkst mir" (You're pulling my leg).

See also gonkulator.

2. (British) To grab some sleep at an odd time.

Compare gronk out.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-03-07

Nearby terms:

goldengolf ball printerGOMgonkgonkulatorGOODGood Thing

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gonkulator

/gon'kyoo-lay-tr/ (From "Hogan's Heroes", the TV series) A pretentious piece of equipment that actually serves no useful purpose. Usually used to describe one's least favourite piece of computer hardware.

See gonk.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-03-07

Nearby terms:

golf ball printerGOMgonkgonkulatorGOODGood ThingGoogle

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GOOD

Graph-Oriented Object Database

Nearby terms:

GOMgonkgonkulatorGOODGood ThingGooglegoogolgoogolplex

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Good Thing

<convention>

(From the 1930 Sellar and Yeatman parody "1066 And All That") Often capitalised; always pronounced as if capitalised.

1. Self-evidently wonderful to anyone in a position to notice: "The Trailblazer's 19.2 Kbaud PEP mode with on-the-fly Lempel-Ziv compression is a Good Thing for sites relaying netnews".

2. Something that can't possibly have any ill side-effects and may save considerable grief later: "Removing the self-modifying code from that shared library would be a Good Thing".

3. When said of software tools or libraries, as in "Yacc is a Good Thing", specifically connotes that the thing has drastically reduced a programmer's work load.

Opposite: Bad Thing, compare big win.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-05-07

Nearby terms:

gonkgonkulatorGOODGood ThingGooglegoogolgoogolplexgopher

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Google

<web>

The web search engine that indexes the greatest number of web pages - over two billion by December 2001 and provides a free service that searches this index in less than a second.

The site's name is apparently derived from "googol", but note the difference in spelling.

The "Google" spelling is also used in "The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy" by Douglas Adams, in which one of Deep Thought's designers asks, "And are you not," said Fook, leaning anxiously foward, "a greater analyst than the Googleplex Star Thinker in the Seventh Galaxy of Light and Ingenuity which can calculate the trajectory of every single dust particle throughout a five-week Dangrabad Beta sand blizzard?"

http://google.com/.

Last updated: 2001-12-28

Nearby terms:

gonkulatorGOODGood ThingGooglegoogolgoogolplexgopherGopher client

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

googol

<mathematics>

The number represented in base-ten by a one with a hundred zeroes after it.

According to Webster's Dictionary, the name was coined in 1938 by Milton Sirotta, the nine-year-old nephew of American mathematician, Edward Kasner.

See also googolplex.

Last updated: 2001-03-29

Nearby terms:

GOODGood ThingGooglegoogolgoogolplexgopherGopher client

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

googolplex

<mathematics>

The number represented in base-ten by a one with a googol zeroes after it.

Last updated: 2001-03-29

Nearby terms:

GooglegoogolgoogolplexgopherGopher clientGopher object type

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gopher

<networking, protocol>

A distributed document retrieval system which started as a Campus Wide Information System at the University of Minnesota, and which was popular in the early 1990s.

Gopher is defined in RFC 1436. The protocol is like a primitive form of HTTP (which came later). Gopher lacks the MIME features of HTTP, but expressed the equivalent of a document's MIME type with a one-character code for the "Gopher object type". At time of writing (2001), all Web browers should be able to access gopher servers, although few gopher servers exist anymore.

Tim Berners-Lee, in his book "Weaving The Web" (pp.72-73), related his opinion that it was not so much the protocol limitations of gopher that made people abandon it in favor of HTTP/HTML, but instead the legal missteps on the part of the university where it was developed:

"It was just about this time, spring 1993, that the University of Minnesota decided that it would ask for a license fee from certain classes of users who wanted to use gopher. Since the gopher software being picked up so widely, the university was going to charge an annual fee. The browser, and the act of browsing, would be free, and the server software would remain free to nonprofit and educational institutions. But any other users, notably companies, would have to pay to use gopher server software.

"This was an act of treason in the academic community and the Internet community. Even if the university never charged anyone a dime, the fact that the school had announced it was reserving the right to charge people for the use of the gopher protocols meant it had crossed the line. To use the technology was too risky. Industry dropped gopher like a hot potato."

Last updated: 2001-03-31

Nearby terms:

googolgoogolplexgopherGopher clientGopher object typeGopherspace

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gopher client

<networking>

A program which runs on your local computer and provides a user interface to the Gopher protocol and to gopher servers. Web browsers can act as Gopher clients and simple Gopher-only clients are available for ordinary terminals, the X Window System, GNU Emacs, and other systems.

ftp://boombox.micro.umn.edu/.

Last updated: 2001-03-31

Nearby terms:

googolplexgopherGopher clientGopher object typeGopherspace

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gopher object type

A character specifying how to display a Gopher document. Current types are:

 0  document
 1  menu
 2  CSO phone book entity
 3  error
 4  binhex binary
 5  DOS binary (deprecated)
 6  UU  binary (deprecated)
 7  index search
 8  telnet connection
 9  binary
 +  duplicate server for previous object
 I  image
 M  MIME document
 T  tn3270 based telnet connection
 c  cal
 g  GIF image
 h  HTML
 s  binary
 u  {Usenet} newsgroup

Last updated: 1999-10-14

Nearby terms:

gopherGopher clientGopher object typeGopherspacegoretsgorilla arm

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gopherspace

<networking>

The sum of all files that can be reached using gopher.

Last updated: 2005-06-08

Nearby terms:

Gopher clientGopher object typeGopherspacegoretsgorilla arm

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gorets

/gor'ets/ The unknown ur-noun, fill in your own meaning. Found especially on the Usenet newsgroup alt.gorets, which seems to be a running contest to redefine the word by implication in the funniest and most peculiar way, with the understanding that no definition is ever final. [A correspondent from the Former Soviet Union informs me that "gorets" is Russian for "mountain dweller" - ESR] Compare frink.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

Gopher object typeGopherspacegoretsgorilla armgo rootgorp

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gorilla arm

The side-effect that destroyed touch-screens as a mainstream input technology despite a promising start in the early 1980s. It seems the designers of all those spiffy touch-menu systems failed to notice that humans aren't designed to hold their arms in front of their faces making small motions. After more than a very few selections, the arm begins to feel sore, cramped, and oversized - the operator looks like a gorilla while using the touch screen and feels like one afterward. This is now considered a classic cautionary tale to human-factors designers; "Remember the gorilla arm!" is shorthand for "How is this going to fly in *real* use?".

Nearby terms:

Gopher object typeGopherspacegoretsgorilla armgo rootgorpGOSIP

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

go root

[Unix] To temporarily enter root mode in order to perform a privileged operation. This use is deprecated in Australia, where the verb "root" refers to animal sex. See su.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

Gopherspacegoretsgorilla armgo rootgorpGOSIPGosling, James

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gorp

/gorp/ (CMU, perhaps from the canonical hiker's food, Good Old Raisins and Peanuts) Another metasyntactic variable, like foo and bar.

Nearby terms:

goretsgorilla armgo rootgorpGOSIPGosling, JamesGOSMACS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GOSIP

Government OSI Profile

Nearby terms:

gorilla armgo rootgorpGOSIPGosling, JamesGOSMACSGosperism

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gosling, James

James Gosling

Nearby terms:

go rootgorpGOSIPGosling, JamesGOSMACSGosperismGOSPLgotcha

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GOSMACS

/goz'maks/ Gosling Emacs. The first Emacs implementation in C, predating but now largely eclipsed by GNU Emacs. Originally freeware; a commercial version is now modestly popular as UniPress Emacs. The author (James Gosling) went on to invent NeWS.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

gorpGOSIPGosling, JamesGOSMACSGosperismGOSPLgotchagoto

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gosperism

/gos'p*r-izm/ A hack, invention, or saying due to arch-hacker R. William (Bill) Gosper. This notion merits its own term because there are so many of them. Many of the entries in HAKMEM are Gosperisms.

See also life.

Nearby terms:

GOSIPGosling, JamesGOSMACSGosperismGOSPLgotchagotoGottlob Frege

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GOSPL

Graphics-Oriented Signal Processing Language. A graphical DSP language for simulation.

["Graphic Oriented Signal Processing Language - GOSPL", C.D. Covington et al, Proc ICASSP-87, 1987].

Nearby terms:

Gosling, JamesGOSMACSGosperismGOSPLgotchagotoGottlob Frege

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gotcha

<jargon, programming>

A misfeature of a system, especially a programming language or environment, that tends to breed bugs or mistakes because it both enticingly easy to invoke and completely unexpected and/or unreasonable in its outcome.

For example, a classic gotcha in C is the fact that

	if (a=b) {code;}

is syntactically valid and sometimes even correct. It puts the value of "b" into "a" and then executes "code" if "a" is non-zero. What the programmer probably meant was

	if (a==b) {code;}

which executes "code" if "a" and "b" are equal.

[Jargon File]

Last updated: 1995-04-17

Nearby terms:

GOSMACSGosperismGOSPLgotchagotoGottlob Fregegovgovernance

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

goto

<programming>

(Or "GOTO", "go to", "GO TO", "JUMP", "JMP") A construct and keyword found in several higher-level programming languages (e.g. Fortran, COBOL, BASIC, C) to cause an unconditional jump or transfer of control from one point in a program to another. The destination of the jump is usually indicated by a label following the GOTO keyword.

In some languages, a label is a line number, in which case every statement may be labelled, in others a label is an optional alphanumeric identifier.

Use of the GOTO instruction in high level language programming fell into disrepute with the development and general acceptance of structured programming, and especially following the famous article "GOTO statement considered harmful". Since a GOTO is effectively an assignment to the program counter, it is tempting to make the generalisation "assignment considered harmful" and indeed, this is the basis of functional programming.

Nearly(?) all machine language instruction sets include a GOTO instruction, though in this context it is usually called branch or jump or some mnemonic based on these.

See also COME FROM.

Last updated: 2000-12-13

Nearby terms:

GosperismGOSPLgotchagotoGottlob FregegovgovernanceGovernment OSI Profile

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gottlob Frege

<person, history, philosophy, mathematics, logic, theory>

(1848-1925) A mathematician who put mathematics on a new and more solid foundation. He purged mathematics of mistaken, sloppy reasoning and the influence of Pythagoras. Mathematics was shown to be a subdivision of formal logic.

[Where?]

Last updated: 1997-07-14

Nearby terms:

gotchagotoGottlob FregegovgovernanceGovernment OSI Profile

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gov

<networking>

The top-level domain for US government bodies.

Last updated: 1999-01-26

Nearby terms:

gotoGottlob FregegovgovernanceGovernment OSI Profilego voice

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

governance

information technology governance

Nearby terms:

Gottlob FregegovgovernanceGovernment OSI Profilego voice

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Government OSI Profile

<networking, standard>

(GOSIP) A subset of OSI standards specific to US Government procurements, designed to maximize interoperability in areas where plain OSI standards are ambiguous or allow excessive options.

Last updated: 1995-12-13

Nearby terms:

Gottlob FregegovgovernanceGovernment OSI Profilego voiceGPgp

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

go voice

<communications>

When two or more parties stop communicating digitally and resuming the conversation via voice communication over the telephone.

Prototypically this is used (e.g., "Wanna go voice?") between two modem users to denote the action of picking up the phone while shutting off the modem, in order to use the same line for voice communication as had was being used for data transmission.

Compare: Voice-Net.

Last updated: 1997-01-31

Nearby terms:

govgovernanceGovernment OSI Profilego voiceGPgpGPFGPIB

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GP

Early system on UNIVAC I or II. Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959).

Nearby terms:

governanceGovernment OSI Profilego voiceGPgpGPFGPIB

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gp

<networking>

The country code for Guadeloupe.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

governanceGovernment OSI Profilego voiceGPgpGPFGPIBGPLGPM

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GPF

General Protection failure/fault

Nearby terms:

Government OSI Profilego voiceGPgpGPFGPIBGPLGPMGPRS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GPIB

IEEE 488

Nearby terms:

Government OSI Profilego voiceGPgpGPFGPIBGPLGPMGPRSGPSGPSS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GPL

1. General Purpose Language.

2. ["A Sample Management Application Program in a Graphical Data-driven Programming language", A.L. Davis et al, Digest of Papers, Compcon Spring 81, Feb 1981, pp. 162-167].

3. Genken Programming Language.

4. General Public License.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

Government OSI Profilego voiceGPgpGPFGPIBGPLGPMGPRSGPSGPSSGPVGPX

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GPM

General Purpose Macro-generator

Nearby terms:

go voiceGPgpGPFGPIBGPLGPMGPRSGPSGPSSGPVGPXgq

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GPRS

General Packet Radio Service

Nearby terms:

GPgpGPFGPIBGPLGPMGPRSGPSGPSSGPVGPXgqgrGRAAL

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GPS

Global Positioning System

Nearby terms:

gpGPFGPIBGPLGPMGPRSGPSGPSSGPVGPXgqgrGRAALgrabber pointer

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GPSS

General Purpose Systems Simulator. Geoffrey Gordon, 1960. Discrete simulations. "The Application of GPSS V to Discrete System Simulation", G. Gordon, P-H 1975. Versions include GPSS II (1963), GPSS III (1965), GPS/360 (1967), and GPSS V (1970).

Nearby terms:

GPIBGPLGPMGPRSGPSGPSSGPVGPXgqgrGRAALgrabber pointer

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GPV

General Public Virus

Nearby terms:

GPLGPMGPRSGPSGPSSGPVGPXgqgrGRAALgrabber pointer

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GPX

Early system on UNIVAC II. Listed in CACM 2(5):16 (May 1959).

Nearby terms:

GPRSGPSGPSSGPVGPXgqgrGRAALgrabber pointerGrace Hopper

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gq

<networking>

The country code for Equatorial Guinea.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

GPSGPSSGPVGPXgqgrGRAALgrabber pointerGrace Hopper

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gr

<networking>

The country code for Greece.

Last updated: 1999-01-27

Nearby terms:

GPSSGPVGPXgqgrGRAALgrabber pointerGrace HopperGRAF

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GRAAL

("Grail") General Recursive Applicative and Algorithmic Language. FP with polyadic combinators. "Graal: A Functional Programming System with Uncurryfied Combinators and its Reduction Machine", P. Bellot in ESOP 86, G. Goos ed, LNCS 213, Springer 1986.

Nearby terms:

GPXgqgrGRAALgrabber pointerGrace HopperGRAFGraffiti

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

grabber pointer

<operating system>

A mouse pointer sprite in the shape of a small hand that closes when a mouse button is clicked, indicating that the object on the screen under the pointer has been selected.

Last updated: 2012-07-08

Nearby terms:

gqgrGRAALgrabber pointerGrace HopperGRAFGraffitiGRAIL

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Grace Hopper

<person>

US Navy Rear Admiral Grace Brewster Hopper (1906-12-09 to 1992-01-01), née Grace Brewster Murray.

Hopper is believed to have concieved the concept of the compiler with the A-0 in 1952. She also developed the first commercial high-level language, which eventually evolved into COBOL. She worked on the Mark I computer with Howard Aiken and with BINAC in 1949.

She is credited with having coined the term "debug", and the adage "it is always easier to ask forgiveness than it is to get permission" (with various wordings), which has been the guiding principle in sysadmin decisions ever since.

See also the entries debug and bug.

Hopper is buried at Arlington National Cemetery. In 1994, the US Navy named a new ship, the guided-missile destroyer USS Hopper, after her.

Last updated: 1999-06-29

Nearby terms:

grGRAALgrabber pointerGrace HopperGRAFGraffitiGRAILGRAIN

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GRAF

GRaphic Additions to Fortran.

Fortran plus graphic data types.

["GRAF: Graphic Additions to Fortran", A. Hurwitz et al, Proc SJCC 30 (1967)].

[Sammet 1969, p. 674].

Last updated: 1995-01-23

Nearby terms:

GRAALgrabber pointerGrace HopperGRAFGraffitiGRAILGRAIN

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graffiti

Handwriting recognition software for the Newton and Zoomer which recognises symbols that aren't necessarily letters. This gives greater speed and accuracy. It was written by Berkeley Softworks.

Last updated: 1995-01-24

Nearby terms:

grabber pointerGrace HopperGRAFGraffitiGRAILGRAINgrain

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GRAIL

Graphical Input Language.

A flow chart language entered on a graphics tablet. The graphical follow-on to JOSS.

["The GRAIL Language and Operations", T.O. Ellis et al, RM-6001-ARPA, RAND, Sept 1969].

Last updated: 1995-01-23

Nearby terms:

grabber pointerGrace HopperGRAFGraffitiGRAILGRAINgrainGRAMgrammar

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GRAIN

A pictorial query language.

["Pictorial Information Systems", S.K. Chang et al eds, Springer 1980].

Last updated: 1995-01-23

Nearby terms:

GRAFGraffitiGRAILGRAINgrainGRAMgrammargrammar analysis

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

grain

granularity

Nearby terms:

GraffitiGRAILGRAINgrainGRAMgrammargrammar analysisgrammatical inference

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GRAM

An extension of BNF used by the SIS compiler generator.

["SIS - Semantics Implementation System", P.D. Mosses, TR DAIMI MD-30, Aarhus U, Denmark].

Last updated: 1995-01-23

Nearby terms:

GRAINgrainGRAMgrammargrammar analysisgrammatical inference

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

grammar

<language>

A formal definition of the syntactic structure (the syntax) of a language.

A grammar is normally represented as a set of production rules which specify the order of constituents and their sub-constituents in a sentence (a well-formed string in the language). Each rule has a left-hand side symbol naming a syntactic category (e.g. "noun-phrase" for a natural language grammar) and a right-hand side which is a sequence of zero or more symbols. Each symbol may be either a terminal symbol or a non-terminal symbol. A terminal symbol corresponds to one "lexeme" - a part of the sentence with no internal syntactic structure (e.g. an identifier or an operator in a computer language). A non-terminal symbol is the left-hand side of some rule.

One rule is normally designated as the top-level rule which gives the structure for a whole sentence.

A parser (a kind of recogniser) uses a grammar to parse a sentence, assigning a terminal syntactic category to each input token and a non-terminal category to each appropriate group of tokens, up to the level of the whole sentence. Parsing is usually preceded by lexical analysis. The opposite, generation, starts from the top-level rule and chooses one alternative production wherever there is a choice.

In computing, a formal grammar, e.g. in BNF, can be used to parse a linear input stream, such as the source code of a program, into a data structure that expresses the (or a) meaning of the input in a form that is easier for the computer to work with. A compiler compiler like yacc might be used to convert a grammar into code for the parser of a compiler. A grammar might also be used by a transducer, a translator or a syntax directed editor.

See also attribute grammar.

Last updated: 2009-02-06

Nearby terms:

grainGRAMgrammargrammar analysisgrammatical inferenceGrandfather, Father, Son

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

grammar analysis

<language>

A program written in ABC for answering such questions as "what are the start symbols of all rules", "what symbols can follow this symbol", "which rules are left recursive", and so on. Includes a grammar of ISO Pascal.

Version 1 by Steven Pemberton <Steven.Pemberton@cwi.nl>. Ports to Unix, MS-DOS, Atari, Macintosh. FTP: ftp.eu.net, ftp.nluug.net programming/languages/abc/examples/grammar/.

Last updated: 1993-07-05

Nearby terms:

grammargrammar analysisgrammatical inferenceGrandfather, Father, Son

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

grammatical inference

Deducing a grammar from given examples. Also known as "inductive inference" and recently as "computational learning".

Nearby terms:

grammar analysisgrammatical inferenceGrandfather, Father, Son

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Grandfather, Father, Son

<operating system>

(GFS) A backup rotation scheme in which a "grandfather" backup is performed on the first Monday of each month, a "father" backup is performed on every other Monday and a "son" backup is performed on every other day of the week. Grandfather tapes are kept for a year, father tapes for a month and son tapes for a week. The exact schedule (and thus the number of tapes required) may vary, as may the choice of full backup or incremental backup, but the idea is that it should be possible to restore versions of any file of different ages: e.g. yesterday's, last week's or last year's version.

Last updated: 2004-10-11

Nearby terms:

grammatical inferenceGrandfather, Father, SongranularityGrapes

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

granularity

<jargon, parallel>

The size of the units of code under consideration in some context. The term generally refers to the level of detail at which code is considered, e.g. "You can specify the granularity for this profiling tool".

The most common computing use is in parallelism or concurrency where "fine grain parallelism" means individual tasks are relatively small in terms of code size and execution time, "coarse grain" is the opposite. You talk about the "granularity" of the parallelism.

The smaller the granularity, the greater the potential for parallelism and hence speed-up but the greater the overheads of synchronisation and communication.

Last updated: 1997-05-08

Nearby terms:

grammatical inferenceGrandfather, Father, SongranularityGrapesGrapevine

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Grapes

A Modula-like system description language.

E-mail: <peter@cadlab.cadlab.de>.

["GRAPES Language Description. Syntax, Semantics and Grammar of GRAPES-86", Siemens Nixdorf Inform, Berlin 1991, ISBN 3-8009-4112-0].

Nearby terms:

Grandfather, Father, SongranularityGrapesGrapevinegraph

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Grapevine

A distributed system project.

[Who? Where? Why?]

Nearby terms:

GrapesGrapevinegraphGraph Algorithm and Software Package

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graph

<mathematics>

1. A collection of nodes and edges.

See also connected graph, degree, directed graph, Moore bound, regular graph, tree.

<graphics>

2. A visual representation of algebraic equations or data.

Last updated: 1996-09-22

Nearby terms:

GrapevinegraphGraph Algorithm and Software Packagegraph coloring

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graph Algorithm and Software Package

<library>

(GASP) A PL/I extension for programming graph algorithms.

["GASP - Gprah Algorithm Software Package", S. Chase, TR CS Dept, U Illinois, Dec 1969].

Last updated: 1998-02-27

Nearby terms:

graphGraph Algorithm and Software Packagegraph coloringgraph colouring

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graph coloring

graph colouring

Nearby terms:

Graph Algorithm and Software Packagegraph coloringgraph colouring

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graph colouring

<application>

A constraint-satisfaction problem often used as a test case in research, which also turns out to be equivalent to certain real-world problems (e.g. register allocation). Given a connected graph and a fixed number of colours, the problem is to assign a colour to each node, subject to the constraint that any two connected nodes cannot be assigned the same colour. This is an example of an NP-complete problem.

See also four colour map theorem.

Nearby terms:

graph coloringgraph colouringGraphic ALGOLGraphical Kernel System

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graphic ALGOL

<language>

A extension of ALGOL 60 for real-time generation of shaded perspective pictures.

["An Extended ALGOL 60 for Shaded Computer Graphics", B. Jones, Proc ACM Symp on Graphic Languages, Apr 1976].

Last updated: 2011-03-08

Nearby terms:

graph colouringGraphic ALGOLGraphical Kernel SystemGraphical User Interface

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graphical Kernel System

<graphics, standard>

(GKS) The widely recognised standard ANSI X3.124 for graphical input/output. GKS is worked on by the ISO/IEC group JTC1/SC24. It provides applications programmers with standard methods of creating, manipulating, and displaying or printing computer graphics on different types of computer graphics output devices. It provides an abstraction to save programmers from dealing with the detailed capabilities and interfaces of specific hardware.

GKS defines a basic two-dimensional graphics system with: uniform input and output primitives; a uniform interface to and from a GKS metafile for storing and transferring graphics information. It supports a wide range of graphics output devices including such as printers, plotters, vector graphics devices, storage tubes, refresh displays, raster displays, and microfilm recorders.

Last updated: 1999-04-01

Nearby terms:

Graphic ALGOLGraphical Kernel SystemGraphical User Interface

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graphical User Interface

<operating system>

(GUI) The use of pictures rather than just words to represent the input and output of a program. A program with a GUI runs under some windowing system (e.g. The X Window System, MacOS, Microsoft Windows, Acorn RISC OS, NEXTSTEP). The program displays certain icons, buttons, dialogue boxes, etc. in its windows on the screen and the user controls it mainly by moving a pointer on the screen (typically controlled by a mouse) and selecting certain objects by pressing buttons on the mouse while the pointer is pointing at them. This contrasts with a command line interface where communication is by exchange of strings of text.

Windowing systems started with the first real-time graphic display systems for computers, namely the SAGE Project [Dates?] and Ivan Sutherland's Sketchpad (1963). Douglas Engelbart's Augmentation of Human Intellect project at SRI in the 1960s developed the On-Line System, which incorporated a mouse-driven cursor and multiple windows. Several people from Engelbart's project went to Xerox PARC in the early 1970s, most importantly his senior engineer, Bill English. The Xerox PARC team established the WIMP concept, which appeared commercially in the Xerox 8010 (Star) system in 1981.

Beginning in 1980(?), led by Jef Raskin, the Macintosh team at Apple Computer (which included former members of the Xerox PARC group) continued to develop such ideas in the first commercially successful product to use a GUI, the Apple Macintosh, released in January 1984. In 2001 Apple introduced Mac OS X.

Microsoft modeled the first version of Windows, released in 1985, on Mac OS. Windows was a GUI for MS-DOS that had been shipped with IBM PC and compatible computers since 1981. Apple sued Microsoft over infringement of the look-and-feel of the MacOS. The court case ran for many years.

[Wikipedia].

Last updated: 2002-03-25

Nearby terms:

Graphical Kernel SystemGraphical User InterfaceGraphic Display Interface

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graphic Display Interface

<hardware>

(GDI) graphics adaptor.

Last updated: 1995-03-16

Nearby terms:

Graphical User InterfaceGraphic Display InterfaceGraphic Language

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graphic Language

For specifying graphic operations.

["A Problem Oriented Graphic Language", P.J. Schwinn, proc ACM 22nd Natl Conf, 1967].

[Sammet 1969, p. 677].

Nearby terms:

Graphic Display InterfaceGraphic Languagegraphicsgraphics accelerator

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graphics

<graphics>

Any kind of visible output including text, images, movies, line art and digital photographs; stored in bitmap or vector graphic form.

Most modern computers can display non-text data and most use a graphical user interface (GUI) for virtually all interaction with the user. Special hardware, typically some kind of graphics adaptor, is required to allow the computer to display graphics (as opposed to, say, printing text on a teletype) but since GUIs became ubiquitous this has become the default form of visual output. The most demanding applications for computer graphics are those where the computer actually generates moving images in real time, especially in video games.

There are many kinds of software devoted to manipulating graphical data, including image editing (e.g. Photoshop), drawing (e.g. Illustrator), user interface toolkits (e.g. X Window System), CAD, CGI.

Last updated: 2009-06-24

Nearby terms:

Graphic Languagegraphicsgraphics acceleratorgraphics adapter

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graphics accelerator

<graphics, hardware>

Hardware (often an extra circuit board) to perform tasks such as plotting lines and surfaces in two or three dimensions, filling, shading and hidden line removal.

Last updated: 1997-07-14

Nearby terms:

graphicsgraphics acceleratorgraphics adaptergraphics adaptor

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graphics adapter

graphics adaptor

Nearby terms:

graphics acceleratorgraphics adaptergraphics adaptorgraphics card

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graphics adaptor

<hardware, graphics>

(Or "graphics adapter", "graphics card", "video adaptor", etc.) A circuit board fitted to a computer, especially an IBM PC, containing the necessary video memory and other electronics to provide a bitmap display.

Adaptors vary in the resolution (number of pixels) and number of colours they can display, and in the refresh rate they support. These parameters are also limited by the monitor to which the adaptor is connected. A number of such display standards, e.g. SVGA, have become common and different software requires or supports different sets.

Last updated: 1996-09-16

Nearby terms:

graphics adaptergraphics adaptorgraphics cardGraphics Interchange Format

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graphics card

graphics adaptor

Nearby terms:

graphics adaptorgraphics cardGraphics Interchange FormatGraphics Interface Format

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graphics Interchange Format

<graphics, file format>

/gif/, occasionally /jif/ (GIF, GIF 89A) A standard for digitised images compressed with the LZW algorithm, defined in 1987 by CompuServe (CIS).

Graphics Interchange Format and GIF are service marks of CompuServe Incorporated. This only affects use of GIF within Compuserve, and pass-through licensing for software to access them, it doesn't affect anyone else's use of GIF. It followed from a 1994 legal action by Unisys against CIS for violating Unisys's LZW software patent. The CompuServe Vice President has stated that "CompuServe is committed to keeping the GIF 89A specification as an open, fully-supported, non-proprietary specification for the entire on-line community including the web".

Filename extension: .gif.

File format.

GIF89a specification.

See also progressive coding, animated GIF.

Last updated: 2000-09-12

Nearby terms:

graphics cardGraphics Interchange FormatGraphics Interface Format

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graphics Interface Format

<spelling>

You mean "Graphics Interchange Format".

Last updated: 1999-10-11

Nearby terms:

Graphics Interchange FormatGraphics Interface FormatGraphics Language Object System

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graphics Language Object System

<graphics, language>

(GLOS) A language with statements for describing graphics objects (line, circle, polygon, etc.), written by Michael J McLean and Brian Hicks at the University of Queensland, St. Lucia in 1978. New objects are defined using procedures. 2-D transformations are context dependent and may be nested.

[M.J. McLean, "The Semantics of Computer Drafting Languages", PhD thesis, University of Queensland, 1978].

[Hicks, B.W., and McLean, M.J. "A Graphic Language for Describing Line Objects", Proceedings of the DECUS-Australia August 1973 Symposium, Melbourne, 1973].

Last updated: 2002-06-01

Nearby terms:

Graphics Interface FormatGraphics Language Object Systemgraphic workstation

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graphic workstation

<graphics, computer>

A workstation specifically configured for graphics works such as image manipulation, bitmap graphics ("paint"), and vector graphics ("draw") type applications. Such work requires a powerful CPU and a high resolution display.

A graphic workstation is very similar to a CAD workstation and, given the typical specifications of personal computers currently available in 1999, the distinctions are very blurred and are more likely to depend on availability of specific software than any detailed hardware requirements.

Last updated: 1999-05-04

Nearby terms:

Graphics Language Object Systemgraphic workstationGraph-Oriented Object Database

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Graph-Oriented Object Database

<language, database>

(GOOD) A graph manipulation language for use as a database query language.

["A Graph-Oriented Object Database Model", M. Gyssens et al, Proc ACM Symp Princs of Database Sys, Mar 1990].

Last updated: 1995-03-07

Nearby terms:

graphic workstationGraph-Oriented Object Databasegraph plotter

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graph plotter

plotter

Nearby terms:

Graph-Oriented Object Databasegraph plottergraph reduction

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graph reduction

A technique invented by Chris Wadsworth where an expression is represented as a directed graph (usually drawn as an inverted tree). Each node represents a function call and its subtrees represent the arguments to that function. Subtrees are replaced by the expansion or value of the expression they represent. This is repeated until the tree has been reduced to a value with no more function calls (a normal form).

In contrast to string reduction, graph reduction has the advantage that common subexpressions are represented as pointers to a single instance of the expression which is only reduced once. It is the most commonly used technique for implementing lazy evaluation.

Nearby terms:

graph plottergraph reductiongraph rewriting systemGRAPPLE

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graph rewriting system

An extension of a term rewriting system which uses graph reduction on terms represented by directed graphs to avoid duplication of work by sharing expressions.

Nearby terms:

graph plottergraph reductiongraph rewriting systemGRAPPLEGRAS

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GRAPPLE

GRAPh Processing LanguagE. 1968.

["A Directed Graph Representation for Computer Simulation of Belief Systems", L.G. Tesler et al, Math Biosciences 2:19-40 (1968)].

Nearby terms:

graph reductiongraph rewriting systemGRAPPLEGRASGRASP/Ada

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GRAS

A public domain graph-oriented database system for software engineering applications from RWTH Aachen.

Nearby terms:

graph rewriting systemGRAPPLEGRASGRASP/AdaGRASPINgrault

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GRASP/Ada

Graphical Representation of Algorithms, Structures and Processes.

["A Graphically Oriented Specification Language for Automatic Code Generation", J.H. Cross, Auburn U, NASA CR-183212, 1989].

Nearby terms:

graph rewriting systemGRAPPLEGRASGRASP/AdaGRASPINgraultGray

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

GRASPIN

An Esprit project to develop a personal software engineering environment to support the construction and verification of distributed and non-sequential software systems.

Nearby terms:

GRAPPLEGRASGRASP/AdaGRASPINgraultGraygraybar landGray code

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

grault

/grawlt/ Yet another metasyntactic variable, invented by Mike Gallaher and propagated by the GOSMACS documentation. See corge.

[Jargon File]

Nearby terms:

GRASGRASP/AdaGRASPINgraultGraygraybar landGray codegray-scale

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gray

A parser generator written in Forth by Martin Anton Ertl <anton@mips.complang.tuwien.ac.at>. Gray takes grammars in an extended BNF and produces executable Forth code for recursive descent parsers. There is no special support for error handling. Version 3 runs under Tile Forth Release 2 by Mikael Patel.

Last updated: 1992-05-22

Nearby terms:

GRASP/AdaGRASPINgraultGraygraybar landGray codegray-scale

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

graybar land

<jargon>

The place you go while you're staring at a computer that's processing something very slowly (while you watch the grey bar creep across the screen).

"I was in graybar land for hours, waiting for that CAD rendering".

Last updated: 1997-04-17

Nearby terms:

GRASPINgraultGraygraybar landGray codegray-scale<gr&d>

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

Gray code

<hardware>

A binary sequence with the property that only one bit changes between any two consecutive elements (the two codes have a Hamming distance of one).

The Gray code originated when digital logic circuits were built from vacuum tubes and electromechanical relays. Counters generated tremendous power demands and noise spikes when many bits changed at once. E.g. when incrementing a register containing 11111111, the back-EMF from the relays' collapsing magnetic fields required copious noise suppression. Using Gray code counters, any increment or decrement changed only one bit, regardless of the size of the number.

Gray code can also be used to convert the angular position of a disk to digital form. A radial line of sensors reads the code off the surface of the disk and if the disk is half-way between two positions each sensor might read its bit from both positions at once but since only one bit differs between the two, the value read is guaranteed to be one of the two valid values rather than some third (invalid) combination (a glitch).

One possible algorithm for generating a Gray code sequence is to toggle the lowest numbered bit that results in a new code each time. Here is a four bit Gray code sequence generated in this way:

	0 0 0 0
	0 0 0 1
	0 0 1 1
	0 0 1 0
	0 1 1 0
	0 1 1 1
	0 1 0 1
	0 1 0 0
	1 1 0 0
	1 1 0 1
	1 1 1 1
	1 1 1 0
	1 0 1 0
	1 0 1 1
	1 0 0 1
	1 0 0 0

The codes were patented in 1953 by Frank Gray, a Bell Labs researcher.

http://nist.gov/dads/HTML/graycode.html.

Last updated: 2002-08-29

Nearby terms:

graultGraygraybar landGray codegray-scale<gr&d>GREgreater than

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google

gray-scale

<spelling>

US spelling of "grey-scale".

Nearby terms:

Graygraybar landGray codegray-scale<gr&d>GREgreater than

Try this search on Wikipedia, OneLook, Google


Loading